auxiliary verb

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auxiliary verb

Auxiliary verbs (also called helping verbs) are verbs that add functional meaning to other “main” or “full” verbs in a clause. They are used to create different tenses or aspects, to form negatives and interrogatives, or to add emphasis to a sentence. However, they do not have semantic meaning unto themselves.
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auxiliary verb

n. Abbr. aux. or aux. v.
A verb, such as have, can, or will, that accompanies the main verb in a clause and helps to make distinctions in mood, voice, aspect, and tense.

auxiliary verb

n
(Grammar) a verb used to indicate the tense, voice, mood, etc, of another verb where this is not indicated by inflection, such as English will in he will go, was in he was eating and he was eaten, do in I do like you, etc

auxil′iary verb′


n.
a verb used in construction with certain forms of other verbs, as infinitives or participles, to express distinctions of tense, aspect, mood, etc., as did in Did you go?, have in We have spoken, or can in They can see. Also called helping verb.
[1755–65]

auxiliary verb

A verb that accompanies and augments the meaning of a main verb, for example, “can” in “can do.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxiliary verb - a verb that combines with another verb in a verb phrase to help form tense, mood, voice, or condition of the verb it combines with
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
modal, modal auxiliary, modal auxiliary verb, modal verb - an auxiliary verb (such as `can' or `will') that is used to express modality
Translations
pomocné sloveso
apuverbi
segédige
hjálparsagnorðhjálparsögn
조동사
yardımcı fiil
References in periodicals archive ?
In (38), we have the entry for the form est, 3rd person singular indicative of the full verb and auxiliary etre.
They may be backformations, but their existence suggests that pend is viewed as a full verb, and while it may be defective for most speakers, its forms can be used.
present -s (though no -th), which indicates a development towards a full verb, cf.
The reduction of expected *mai to ma probably accompanied its development into an oblique marker, in much the same way as the Kamang light verb me is derived from the full verb met 'take' (section 3.
9) Silic (2006: 66) notices a feature typical for the nominal nature of the administrative and business functional style, namely the replacement of a full verb by a semiverb (or semicopular verb) in combination with a deverbal noun.
It is at this point that suffixation can take place to create full verb forms using the most common first conjugation infinitive ending -are to form the verbs bloggare, chattare, cliccare, and loggarsi.
Most scholars would assume that, if one could have heard the full verb form jr.
Now you have the full verb phrase: should have studied.
The only full verb is "is," which is then cliticized to its subject in the second couplet.
If the verb cannot or shall not be raised into higher V'-shells for structural or pragmatic reasons, then the DO must be licensed by the "dummy verb" ba, which occurs in the same position to which the full verb moves in (9).
Analysing this sentence we observe that there are two verbs: say, the full verb in the main clause and be in the subordinate nominal clause.