Fumish

Fum´ish


a.1.Smoky; hot; choleric.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like "nickum", a dishonest person, "wlonk" meaning arrogant, "losenger" for liar or "fumish" meaning a hot head.
A lone Chinese man confronting a tank, a Cuban outlasting his cowardly captors' tortures for years, Alexander Solzhenitsyn facing monstrous dictators with the truth, or our own American Founders staking their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor on the outcome of our Revolution, fumish us with the examples of integrity, tenacity, and steadfastness to which we should attach ourselves.
As owners of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), women fumish local, national and multinational companies with ideas, technology, supplies, components and business services (Jalbert, 2000).
Ex Laws) or maple (Acer spp.) fumish (American Wood Fibers, Schofield, Wisconsin) and powdered polypropylene (Exxon PP3505G-E1).
Without real-time metering for generation control, the customer contracting with the off system supplier will likely be required to fumish a schedule to both the generation and transmission providers so that each can operate their own systems to match the power flow to the customer.
5) were closely related and significantly reduced by the use of CCA-treated fumish and lower wood/cement and water/cement ratios.
McManamon's book, read first, fumishes historical background for Haight's work, which, in turn, offers a bridge to the Zeitlin volume.
Language for Trench was a manifestation of an innate, God-given faculty: "God gave man language, just as He gave him reason, and just because He gave him reason, (for what is man's word but his reason coming forth, so that it may behold itself?)" (25) This is not to say that "man started at the first fumished with a full-formed vocabulary of words....
Meeting rooms have also been fumished with bureaux, dining tables and tall boys.