funnel cloud

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funnel cloud

n.
A funnel-shaped cloud descending from a larger cloud, especially from a wall cloud, caused by the sudden condensation of water in the extreme low pressure of rapidly rotating air, as typically occurs in a tornado.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

funnel cloud

n
(Physical Geography) a whirling column of cloud extending downwards from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud: part of a waterspout or tornado
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fun′nel cloud`


n.
a rapidly rotating funnel-shaped cloud extending downward from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud, which, if it touches the surface of the earth, is a tornado or waterspout.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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There were also reports of wind damage, funnel clouds and waterspouts.
The wet and stormy weather has also saw funnel clouds signal the start of a tornado in the area.
"What makes our job more difficult, when looking for a missing person here, are the insufficient or unclear information, the rough and rocky mountain areas which are hard to get to, and the unstable weather conditions, mainly the atmospheric pressures, funnel clouds and heavy showers."
"They are sometimes seen as threatening funnel clouds descending from stormy skies.
According to the Met Office funnel clouds are spinning fingers of cloud that reach towards the ground or sea.
He said they are different from funnel clouds which form at cloud level and work their way to the ground.
Videos and pictures captured the freak phenomenon, known by weather experts as funnel clouds, in Guisborough and Middlesbrough respectively.
"Funnel clouds are quite common, but touching the ground is less common.
The funnel clouds can pack extremely damaging winds as well as water droplets, dust and debris; they're considered the most violent of atmospheric storms.
Funnel clouds were spotted as far north as Illinois and Indiana, but no fatalities were reported.
Funnel clouds typically occur in the Willamette Valley in the late afternoon, usually in the spring or fall, after a front of rain passes through and is followed by showers, Neuman said.
As they develop, we often see funnel-shaped clouds extending from the base of the cloud and it is only when these funnel clouds touch the ground that we get a tornado.