Erinyes

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E·rin·y·es

 (ĭ-rĭn′ē-ēz′)
pl.n. Greek Mythology
The demonic female spirits, often three in number, who pursue and punish the doers of unavenged crimes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Erinyes

(ɪˈrɪnɪˌiːz)
pl n, sing Erinys (ɪˈrɪnɪs; ɪˈraɪ-)
(Classical Myth & Legend) myth another name for the Furies
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Erinyes - (classical mythology) the hideous snake-haired monsters (usually three in number) who pursued unpunished criminals
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Alecto - one of the three Furies
Megaera - one of the three Furies
Tisiphone - one of the three Furies
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the Romans, they were known as the Dirae or the Furiae. The latter name is a personified form of the Latin plural noun furiae, meaning "frenzy," a derivative of furere, meaning "to rage." Thus the Romans took their word for anger and applied it to the dreaded deities.
In Latin the Erinyes were known as the Furiae or Dirae; it is unclear if they possessed a cult independent of imported Greek belief.