G20

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Related to G-20: WTO, G-7, G-8

G20

 (jē′twĕn′tē, -twŭn′-)
n.
A group of twenty politically and financially influential countries, including those in the G8. Representatives from these countries meet to discuss economic concerns.

[G(roup of) 20.]

G20

abbreviation for
Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors
References in periodicals archive ?
The new commitment by the countries of the G-20 to use all policy tools reflects a shift in the parameters of the discussion within the G-20 in favor of more action to strengthen near-term demand.
During Turkey's temporary presidency of the G-20 this past year, the W-20 was formed with the aim of boosting and promoting greater participation by women in the global workforce.
Since Turkey assumed the presidency of the G-20 in December 2014, our approach toward ensuring inclusive and robust growth through collective action has enjoyed the support of the organization's members.
At the Group of 20 (G-20) summit in Brisbane in November 2014, leaders agreed to reform the global energy governance architecture.
Dervis and Drysdale present readers with a collection of essays and scholarly articles that look at the principles of global governance, managing the G-20, the core G-20 economic agenda, and issues that indicate a need for reform in global governance.
Establishing principles of transparency and clarity has long been on the G-20 agenda and has been a focus of its Anti-Corruption Working Group.
The 2014 G-20 Summit is going to happen this month in Brisbane.
Established in 1999, the G-20 rose to prominence during the global financial crisis of 2008-2009 and is now the premier forum for international economic cooperation.
The G-20 combines the world's major industrialized and developing countries - about 85 percent of the global economy.
The G-20 leaders vowed to strengthen their policy coordination as a slowdown in emerging economies and intensifying market volatility could choke global economic growth.
Japan, which had been facing criticism from other economies that the Bank of Japan was trying to drive the yen lower to boost exports, avoided direct criticism by the G-20 for its monetary policy.