lactase

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lac·tase

 (lăk′tās′)
n.
An enzyme occurring in certain yeasts and in the intestinal juices of mammals and catalyzing the hydrolysis of lactose into glucose and galactose.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lactase

(ˈlækteɪs; -teɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of enzymes that hydrolyse lactose to glucose and galactose
[C20: from lacto- + -ase]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lac•tase

(ˈlæk teɪs, -ˌteɪz)

n.
an enzyme capable of breaking down lactose into glucose and galactose.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lac·tase

(lăk′tās′)
An enzyme that is found in the small intestine, liver, and kidneys of mammals and catalyzes the breakdown of lactose into simpler sugars, such as glucose.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lactase - any of a group of enzymes (trade name Lactaid) that hydrolyze lactose to glucose and galactose
disaccharidase - an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of disaccharides into monosaccharides
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lac·tase

[MIM*603202]
n. lactasa, enzima intestinal que hidroliza la lactosa y produce dextrosa y galactosa.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lactase

n lactasa
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, caused by an inactivating mutation of the lysosomal enzyme -galactosidase (GLB1), which is required for the degradation of GM1 ganglioside and keratan sulfate.
In this study, the most deleterious mutations shared between the two genes were identified and proteins such as GBA2, GLB1 and GALC, which interact with the GBA protein, were mapped.
In the study, the most deleterious mutations shared between the two genes were identified and proteins such as GBA2, GLB1 and GALC, which interact with the GBA protein, were mapped.
The top four genes with a high absolute value of coefficient factor, namely, 2720 (GLB1), 3074 (HEXB), 6677 (SPAM1), and 2799 (GNS), are selected to represent the genes for this canonical variable (Figure 4(b), Table 1).
It is caused by a deficiency of beta-galactosidase (GLB1), a lysosomal hydrolase that maybe defective with respect to keratan sulfate in Morquio B disease (MBD) or to gangliosides, lactosylceramide, asialofetuin, and oligosaccharides carrying terminal beta-linked galactose and keratan sulfate in GM1-gangliosidosis [2].
For reasons described below, we also tested the activity of recombinant human [beta]-galactosidase 1 (GLB1).
GM1 is an extremely severe, autosomal recessive disease caused by a mutation in the GLB1 gene encoding for the lysosomal acid beta-balactosidase ([sz]gal) enzyme.
Therefore, related target genes were also listed, such as ATP1A1, CYP27B1, DHCR7, EBP, GLB1, HSD11B2, HSD17B1, HSD17B3, SRD5A1, and SRD5A2.
In one study, antibodies to the wheat storage globulin Glb1 were found in the serum of diabetic patients, but not in age-, sex-, nor HLA-DQ-matched controls.