genetically modified organism

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genetically modified organism

n. Abbr. GMO
An organism whose genetic characteristics have been altered by the insertion of a modified gene or a gene from another organism using the techniques of genetic engineering.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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* GMO (genetically modified organisms) food: 28.8 percent of owners want to avoid GMO foods. That only applies to grain and plant sources.
In 2016, a report by the National Academy of Sciences turned up no evidence of adverse effects on human health, at least for the GMO foods that are on the market now.
This informative title is packed with interesting facts on global agriculture--from aguaculture to GMO foods, food deserts to urban farms.
In regards to the health problems and GMO foods being a link, not a cause, I would have liked Ms.
Merkley says a long list of products containing or derived from GMO foods would be exempt from the labeling requirement, including such common ingredients as oils, starches and purified proteins.
"According to several scientific studies, consumers who eat GMO foods are at a higher risk of developing cancer, diabetes, infertility, obesity, stroke and other fatal diseases.
And we understand that GMO foods are already present throughout the nation's food chain.
Since 1992, the FDA has been guided in its administrative responsibilities by the "FDA Statement of Policy: Foods Derived from New Plant Varieties." In the overwhelming majority of cases, the policy directs the agency to treat foods derived from GMOs in the same way as those derived from conventionally bred plants, presuming that most foods derived from GMO plants would be "generally recognized as safe." Also since 1992, the FDA places explicit responsibility on the manufacturer--not an independent scientific review board--to assure the safety of GMO foods. Since 1997, however, there has been FDA guidance to industry involving voluntary "consultation procedures" concerning the food safety of new proteins in new plant varieties, including those developed through genetic engineering.
He backed the labeling of GMO foods produced, and he questioned the economic value of pushing GMO technology for small farmers, especially those from developing nations.
These are the issues that could be alleviated if we could focus on embracing, instead of defending, GMO foods."
His endorsement of the bio-tech industry has caused academia to call for field trials of GMO foods "to settle the debate, once and for all".
His "Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act" would prohibit mandatory labeling of GMO foods and also prohibit voters from proposing initiatives to do so at the state level.