GNP


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GNP

abbr.
gross national product

GNP

abbreviation for
(Economics) gross national product

GNP

or G.N.P.,

gross national product.

GNP

Gross national product: a measure of national wealth including overseas income.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.GNP - former measure of the United States economy; the total market value of goods and services produced by all citizens and capital during a given period (usually 1 yr)
value - the quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable; "the Shakespearean Shylock is of dubious value in the modern world"
real GNP, real gross national product - a version of the GNP that has been adjusted for the effects of inflation
Translations

GNP

N ABBR =gross national productPNB m
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1989 Exxon Valdeez oil tanker disaster (which created one of the worst oil slicks in US history) increased Alaska's GNP because so much money was spent in cleaning up the oil and in the subsequent court cases.
The null hypotheses were that there are no statistically significant associations between the rate of diarrhea reported and average temperature, potential water availability, or GNP among 18 Pacific islands.
The GNP of Israel was $32 billion in 1980, $52 billion in 1985, and by 1996 it was $92 billion.
Assertion 3: Let all factors of production be domestically owned so that there is no distinction between GNP and GDP.
Blanchard and Quah (1989) include unemployment data with GNP in a two-variable vector autoregressive (VAR) model.
2 percent of GNP was sustainable against the actual fiscal deficit of 6.
3 percent of GNP spent on health care, 74 percent is public.
Either consumer sentiment causes GNP or it simply anticipates GNP.
Because the GNP is qualified to initiate treatment and, in most states, has at least some degree of prescriptive authority, intervention can begin at the earliest signs of worsening health.
As shown in Table 1A, when base years close to the dates of the recessions are used to evaluate the data, in terms of GNP decline, at 1.
9 per cent of GNP in 1968 and would have increased more during the Vietnam war except for sleight-of-hand accounting which, in effect, borrowed from the public trust funds to pay military costs.
Likewise, the consumption share of GNP soared in the 1980s, rising from a 25-year average of about 64 percent to nearly 69 percent.