grrl


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grrl

A female who spends a lot of time online and is knowledgeable about technology.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Backed by an amazing all-female band, Nash screamed like a banshee on heavy tracks like All Talk and Fri-End?, while obscure covers like My Chinchilla and Grrl Gang upped the intensity even more.
He piled up the notebooks and scrolled through the albums on his iPod to Rilo Kiley's Take Offs and Landings because Rachel had first turned him onto them back three years ago when she'd been a bright-eyed indie rock grrl. And because the first song on the album starts out "if you want to find yourself by traveling out west / Or if you want to find yourself somebody that's better / Go ahead / Go ahead" so it was totally perfect in every conceivable way.
Ademas del libreto para el musical In the Heights, tambien escribio el musical Barrio Grrl!, y los dramas 26 Miles y Yemayas Belly.
There were discussions about anorexia as a protest against first-world greed alongside reviews of riot grrl gigs, visual art projects, and poetry, as well as the thinspiration pages, and fannish love letters to Jodie Kidd and Kate Moss, for which pro-ana has become notorious in the popular imagination.
Clearly written and well-documented, it focuses on popular music such as the 1950s folk revivalists, politically charged rock and folk of the 1960s and 70s, and also punk, new wave, riot grrl, and hip hop.
Mark's Church (Ted Berrigan, Bill Zavatsky, and, especially lovingly rendered here, Alice Notley), and later with a new generation of queer punk performance artists including Sister Spit, with whom she toured in the Riot Grrl 1990s.
The Fool's Grrl (10) by Celia Rees takes the reader into a fascinating construct with a certain
73/ Cathryn Michon--Chats about her best-selling book, The Grrl Genius Guide to Life.
Hill examines specific alternative bands that were used in the series to provide an edge of cool to the show, but more specifically, she identifies them as white subgenres of popular alternative music: Geek, Riot Grrl and Power Girl, Goth, and heavy metal styles and subcultures.
Also joining the ranks: "grrl," or "grrrl," describing a rough-and-tumble female or female punk; "thang," "innit," "biach," "blingy" and - believe it or not - "punanny," which you can look up yourself.
An example is the blog Riot Grrl in the UK, which appears to have stopped being updated as of 2007 (see Figure 4).
Not surprisingly, a lot of the bands on the list were trailblazers: Lou Reed's Velvet Underground introduced new, then-unheard-of sounds into the rock scene; Public Enemy gave rap its first big push into the public consciousness; and Sleater-Kinney was a vanguard of the riot grrl scene.