Gadsden Purchase


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Gadsden Purchase

An area in extreme southern New Mexico and Arizona south of the Gila River. It was purchased by the United States from Mexico in 1853 to ensure territorial rights for a practicable southern railroad route to the Pacific Coast.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gadsden Purchase

(ˈɡædzdən)
n
(Placename) an area of about 77 000 sq km (30 000 sq miles) in present-day Arizona and New Mexico, bought by the US from Mexico for 10 million dollars in 1853. The purchase was negotiated by James Gadsden (1788–1858), US diplomat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Gads′den Pur′chase


n.
a tract of 45,535 sq. mi. (117,935 sq. km), now contained in New Mexico and Arizona, purchased for $10,000,000 from Mexico in 1853, the treaty being negotiated by James Gadsden.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Gadsden Purchase

1853. Territory acquired from Mexico permitting easy rail connections to be built between Texas and California.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
acquired even more Mexican land in the Gadsden Purchase. In total, the U.S.
In 1853 the United States purchased the remaining territory making up our current southern boundary (the Gadsden Purchase).
The Gadsden Purchase of 1853 increased the size of New Mexico and which other US state?
Tucson: A History of the Old Pueblo From the 1854 Gadsden Purchase
agreed to buy some 45,000 square miles of land from Mexico for $10 million in a deal known as the Gadsden Purchase.
In which two modern US states was the land deal the Gadsden Purchase made in 1853?
The section ends not with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, by which the United States received the Mexican Cession, but instead in 1855, after the Gadsden Purchase and a bi-national boundary commission finalized a border, apparently setting to rest territorial differences between the two nations.
The second chapter focuses on La Mesilla and Las Cruces, showing how each town, established in the aftermath of the US-Mexican War and located on the opposite sides of the new borderline (before the 1854 Gadsden Purchase moved La Mesilla to US soil as well), reflected a particular vision of national belonging.
Pierce's presidency (1853-1857) saw the Gadsden Purchase, acquiring territory which would become parts of the states of Arizona and New Mexico.