hibernicization

(redirected from Gaelicization)
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hibernicization

,

hibernicisation

,

hibernization

or

hibernisation

n
the process or act of making Irish
References in periodicals archive ?
The Society for the Preservation of the Irish Language was founded in 1876, and beyond this one group, the growing interest among the Irish middle classes in Gaelic identity and Gaelicization can be dated to the 1870s and onward.
Their topic include Robert Louis Stevenson deconstructs Treasure Island, the Gaelicization of Brasil Island from cartographic error to Celtic Elysium, hazardous voyages and contested representations in Milton's Samson Agonistes, lady castaways of the Gilded Age in Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, and ecology and nature--a case study of how reality television and fictional films frame representations of islands.
As a result his suggestion that they grow gentians, "the kind you find in Galway," intimates a possible solution (230): the gaelicization of the English Cliff End.
(5) He linked such assertions to the historical importance of religion and argued that definitions of nationality must recognize the coterminous existence of Catholicism and Gaelicization in an Irish setting.
Rather, "Some Work Before Us" offers Moran's focus on gaelicization within the Twenty-Six Counties; this focus epitomizes The Leader's discursive strategy of occluding mention of the North in expressing support of the Treaty.
Their preoccupation, in other words, was not so much with the 'Anglicization' of the Irish as with the 'Gaelicization' of the English" (145).
Leerssen's comment is contained within a paragraph that also invokes Charles Vallancey, Charlotte Brooke, Joseph Cooper Walker and the "patriot playwrights" Gorges Edmond Howard and Francis Dobbs as significant contributors to the process of the "gaelicization of collective memory" that took place between 1760 and 1840.
Rather, while retaining some sympathy for the League's efforts in the spheres of education and scholarship, he, like Rolleston, believed Gaelicization was not the only, or the most effective, means of asserting Ireland's cultural independence.
But meanwhile, English officials were observing disturbing gaelicization trends within powerful Fitzgerald and Butler lordships and in other ruling families.
The chief subjects of debate in Irish-language journals during the period were the implications of the Gaelicization of the educational system, whether the fortunes of the language would be best advanced through an emphasis on the spoken word or on literacy and the study of literary texts, government policies concerning the Gaeltacht, and the slow pace at which the government-supported press, An Gum, produced fresh titles.