Gaidhealtachd

Gaidhealtachd

(ˈɡeɪlˌtæxt; ˈɡaɛlˌtaxɡ)
n
1. (Placename) the area of Scotland in which Scottish Gaelic is the vernacular speech. See also Gaeltacht
2. (Peoples) the culture and traditions of the Scottish Gaels
[Scottish Gaelic]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Students of Plockton Music School in the Highlands - Sgoil Chiuil Na Gaidhealtachd - will play at Stirling'sTolbooth for the final night of their annual tour ONTHURSDAY, June 20.
(11) Neil Davidson believes that ethnic and cultural hostilities survive because the concept of 'Scottishness is at least partly the product of imperialism and ethnic cleansing.' (12) Likewise, while Stephanie Lehner traces lines of (trans)national subalternity across Scotland and Ireland as a postcolonial marker, (13) Michael Gardiner argues that 'the devolution era models of multiculturalism [...] have been a way to keep using the idea of 'race' even after empire.' (14) Silke Stroh traces aspects of the linguistic hierarchy of the nation--English, Scots, and Gaelic--and the double marginality or the Gaidhealtachd, as evidence or the marginality of Scotland as a whole.
Based at Plockton in the West Highlands, the centre - known in the Gaelic as Sgoil Chiuil Na Gaidhealtachd - returns to Kirkcudbright after a successful visit in 2018.
Besides this one text, though, the Gaelic fiction seems more inclined to be set in the Gaidhealtachd, to feature characters who are apparently speaking Gaelic or are what we could describe as Gaels, and to address what we might think of as postcolonial/post(-)colonial issues or issues that arise from a postcolonial/post(-)colonial environment, understood here in a broad and non-technical sense, but discussed at greater length in other articles (Watson 2016, forthcoming a, b).
Ach tha earbsa ann an NHS na Gaidhealtachd aig ire cho iseal 's gu bheil cuid dhen bheachd gur e ro-innleachd ur carach tha seo.
Like the Church in Ireland, the late medieval Church in the Scottish Gaidhealtachd has been the subject of cliche rather than close study.
(21) Mac Colla claims that The Albannach 'was the first novel to treat life in the Gaidhealtachd [the Gaelic-speaking areas of the Scottish Highlands and islands] in a realistic manner', as opposed to the 'authentic but romantic portrayal by such as Neil Munro.
Among the topics are the branch societies of the Highland Society of London, Scottish Gaelic in Argentina, Scottish Highlanders and First Nations, Hugh MacDiarmid and Sorley MacLean as correspondents and collaborators, media ecology for the Gaidhealtachd, the role of new media in Scotland's Gaelic digital service, and an introduction to Manx Gaelic.
As a Hebridean, Torquil of Byron's The Island is native of a region of Scotland that to this day is part of the Gaidhealtachd. His name directly associates him with the Princes of Lewis, their Norwegian ancestors, and the long-since deposed Lords of the Isles, about whom Scott had published in 1815 his poem of that title.
But if one is seeking to construct some kind of canon of early modern Scottish women's writing, then surely the division between literature of the Gaidhealtachd and the Lowlands perpetuates a kind of internal marginalization, another imposition of the double tress.
The closeness to Hebridean Scotland, the heart of the Scots Gaidhealtachd, created a cultural and material exchange between clansmen in both places, long before the planters arrived with their potential to develop an Ulster-Scots tradition.
Brown, "Scottish identity in the seventeenth century"; Jane Dawson, "The Gaidhealtachd and the emergence of the Scottish Highlands"; Jim Smyth, "'No remedy more proper': Anglo-Irish unionism before 1707"; Colin Kidd, "Protestantism, constitutionalism and British identity under the later Stuarts."