pancreatitis

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Related to Gallstone pancreatitis: Gallstones

pan·cre·a·ti·tis

 (păng′krē-ə-tī′tĭs, păn′-)
n.
Inflammation of the pancreas.

pancreatitis

(ˌpæŋkrɪəˈtaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the pancreas

pan•cre•a•ti•tis

(ˌpæn kri əˈtaɪ tɪs, ˌpæŋ-)

n.
inflammation of the pancreas.
[1835–45; < Greek pankreat-, s. of pánkreas pancreas + -itis]

pancreatitis

Inflammation of the pancreas, caused by gallstones, overconsumption of alcohol, or a viral infection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pancreatitis - inflammation of the pancreas; usually marked by abdominal pain
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations

pan·cre·a·ti·tis

n. pancreatitis, infl. del páncreas;
acute ______ aguda;
hemorrhagic, acute ______ hemorrágica aguda.

pancreatitis

n pancreatitis f
References in periodicals archive ?
In a retrospective study of 234 patients admitted for gallstone pancreatitis, almost 90% of recurrent biliary events occurred in patients who did not receive a cholecystectomy within 60 days of hospital discharge.
Complications of gallstones: the Mirizzi syndrome, gallstone ileus, gallstone pancreatitis, complications of "lost" gallstones.
Patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis underwent a MOC during the same hospital admission.
Acute pancreatitis secondary to alcohol is more common in men, whereas gallstone pancreatitis is more common in women and appears to affect African Americans disproportionately for unclear reasons.
The patient was subsequently treated for gallstone pancreatitis with intravenous fluid therapy and analgesia.
Wong, "The optimal timing of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in mild gallstone pancreatitis," American Surgeon, vol.
Of the total study group 78% patients had uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones, 3.33% accounted for incidentally detected asymptomatic gallstones, 0.66% had gallbladder polyps, 16.66% accounted for gallstone complications (such as gallstone pancreatitis, cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice, Mirizzi's syndrome, mucocele and empyema gallbladder) and 1.33% had acalculous cholecystitis.
Our first patient was a 29-year-old female with a recent episode of gallstone pancreatitis without ultrasound evidence of cholecystitis.
Exclusion criteria included patients with USG findings of acute cholecystitis, empyema gallbladder, cholangitis, gallstone pancreatitis, choledocholithiasis, patients having coexisting gall bladder malignancy, patients having previous history of upper midline laparotomy and patients with positive Hepatitis B and C serology.
(3) Gallstone pancreatitis is more common in patient populations that are elderly, female or Caucasian (non-Hispanic).
Another important use of laparoscopic drainage is for patients with gallstone pancreatitis. These patients can have a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed in the same session.