Galveston plan

Galveston plan

(ˈɡælvɪstən)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another term for commission plan
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(50) It is difficult to know if this data informed his position regarding the selection of nonreligious immigrants for the Galveston Plan. The minutes from a November 1906 meeting of the Galveston "Removal Committee" note: "among the towns to which the immigrants would be sent, there will probably be a considerable number where the Jewish population (though growing) is very small." (51) In June 1907--on the eve of the first arrivals--Rabbi Cohen and David Bressler exchanged correspondence and, among other subjects, discussed religious observance.
Schiff insisted the Galveston Plan offered a solution to immigrant overcrowding that addressed Jewish and American interests, but the government chose to reward their efforts with a "repressive policy" of deportation.
Had it been left to do its noble work, these writers insisted, the Galveston Plan would have changed history.
The book ends with rising political action on behalf of Eastern European Jews, ranging from the Galveston Plan, which sought to resettle them in the American West, to efforts to intervene with the Russian tsar on their behalf.
Texas, too, was the site of Jewish colonization schemes, most notably Jacob Schiff's Galveston Plan which directed 10,000 East Europeans away from northern ghettos to the Texas port, where Rabbi Henry Cohen welcomed them.
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