gamma-ray astronomy

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gamma-ray astronomy

n.
The branch of astronomy that uses observations of emissions in the gamma-ray part of electromagnetic spectrum to study extraterrestrial sources such as stars and galaxies.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gamma-ray astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the investigation of cosmic gamma rays, such as those from quasars
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, a different team of researchers collected readings of gamma rays exceeding 100 trillion electron volts.
It was in order to detect these extremely short flashes, and hence gamma-ray emissions, that fourteen countries set up the HESS array(1), the world's largest gamma-ray observatory, in Namibia in 2002.
With more than 100 telescopes located in the northern and southern hemispheres, CTA will be the world's largest and most sensitive highenergy gamma-ray observatory once completed.
(5) Super-Kamiokande:A facility consisting of a subterranean pool used as a Cherenkov-ray collector located in Kamioka, Gifu Prefecture, Japan.6 Sun's cosmic-ray shadow:A phenomenon in which cosmic rays (high-energy charged particles that move through space) are deflected by the sun's magnetic field.7 Ground-based gamma ray observatory, CTA:A future ground-based gamma-ray observatory planned to come online in 2020 with 10 times the sensitivity of existing gamma-ray telescopes.
NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, which operated in the 1990s, detected high-energy flares, but the galaxy was quiet during Fermi's first two and a half years in orbit.
The first were found by NASA's Compton Gamma-ray Observatory in the early 1990s.
The telescope will add to the work of the Hubble Telescope, launched in 1990, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, launched in 1999, and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, which operated for nine years before falling back into Earth's atmosphere in 2000.
The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is scheduled for launch in August, 1998, and will join NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory in exploring the universe.
Using data from the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory in Mexico, the scientists found that two nearby pulsars - despite being the right age and at the right distance to be likely candidates for the excess positrons - are actually "surrounded by an extended murky cloud that prevents most positrons from escaping."