garnet

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gar·net

 (gär′nĭt)
n.
1. Any of several common, widespread aluminum or calcium silicate minerals occurring in two internally isomorphic series, (Mg, Mn, Fe)3Al2Si3O12 and Ca3(Cr, Al, Fe)2Si3O12, generally crystallized, often embedded in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and colored red, brown, black, green, yellow, or white and used both as gemstones and as abrasives.
2. A dark to very dark red.

[Middle English, from Old French grenate, from grenat, pomegranate-red, probably from Latin grānātum, pomegranate, from neuter of grānātus, seedy; see pomegranate.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

garnet

(ˈɡɑːnɪt)
n
(Minerals) any of a group of hard glassy red, yellow, or green minerals consisting of the silicates of calcium, iron, manganese, chromium, magnesium, and aluminium in cubic crystalline form: used as a gemstone and abrasive. Formula: A3B2(SiO4)3 where A is a divalent metal and B is a trivalent metal
[C13: from Old French grenat, from grenat (adj) red, from pome grenate pomegranate]
ˈgarnet-ˌlike adj

garnet

(ˈɡɑːnɪt)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a tackle used for lifting cargo
[C15: probably from Middle Dutch garnaat]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gar•net

(ˈgɑr nɪt)

n.
1. any of a group of hard deep red, brownish, or green vitreous minerals, silicates of calcium, magnesium, iron, or manganese with aluminum or iron: several varieties are used as gems.
2. a deep red color.
[1275–1325; < Old French gernate, grenade < Latin grānātum granular; compare pomegranate]
gar′net•like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gar·net

(gär′nĭt)
Any of several common red, brown, black, green, or yellow minerals consisting of aluminum or calcium silicate. Garnets occur in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, and are used as gemstones and industrial abrasives.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.garnet - any of a group of hard glassy minerals (silicates of various metals) used as gemstones and as an abrasivegarnet - any of a group of hard glassy minerals (silicates of various metals) used as gemstones and as an abrasive
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
almandite, almandine - a deep red garnet consisting of iron aluminum silicate
andradite - a garnet consisting of calcium iron silicate and having any color ranging from yellow and green to brown and black; used as gemstone
cinnamon stone, essonite, hessonite - a garnet ranging in color from yellow to brown
pyrope - a deep red garnet used as a gemstone
rhodolite - a red or pink variety of garnet used as a gemstone
transparent gem - a gemstone having the property of transmitting light without serious diffusion
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

garnet

[ˈgɑːnɪt] Ngranate m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

garnet

[ˈgɑːrnɪt] ngrenat m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

garnet

nGranat m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

garnet

[ˈgɑːnɪt] ngranato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
At first glance, the spectral dependencies of the Faraday effect and MCD measured over the range from 330 nm to 800 nm are attributed to the fact that the introduction of bismuth into the iron garnet structure leads to the appearance of a magneto-optical peculiarities between 330 and 500 nm.
This unique behavior makes the garnet structure flexible in accommodating various chemical substitutions with different ionic radii, suggesting that garnets could be composition diverse where X = [Mg.sup.2+], [Fe.sup.2+], [Ca.sup.2+], [Mn.sup.2+], [Y.sup.3+]; Y = [Al.sup.3+], [Fe.sup.3+], [Cr.sup.3+], and [Y.sup.3+].
The main finding was that the group of compounds [Ca.sub.3][Al.sub.2][Si.sub.3][O.sub.12] (andradite), [Ca.sub.3][Fe.sub.2][Si.sub.3][O.sub.12] (grossularite), [Ca.sub.3][Al.sub.3][H.sub.12][O.sub.12] and [Ca.sub.3][Fe.sub.2][H.sub.12][O.sub.12] form a complete series of solid solutions, with a garnet structure. The phases with hydrogen were called hydrogarnets.