garter snake

(redirected from Garter snakes)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

garter snake

n.
Any of various nonvenomous North and Central American snakes of the genus Thamnophis, having longitudinal stripes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

garter snake

n
(Animals) any nonvenomous North American colubrid snake of the genus Thamnophis, typically marked with longitudinal stripes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gar′ter snake`


n.
any harmless snake of the genus Thamnophis, common in North and Central America, usu. with three longitudinal stripes on the back.
[1760–70, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.garter snake - any of numerous nonvenomous longitudinally-striped viviparous North American and Central American snakesgarter snake - any of numerous nonvenomous longitudinally-striped viviparous North American and Central American snakes
colubrid, colubrid snake - mostly harmless temperate-to-tropical terrestrial or arboreal or aquatic snakes
genus Thamnophis, Thamnophis - garter snakes
common garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis - a garter snake that is widespread in North America
ribbon snake, Thamnophis sauritus - slender yellow-striped North American garter snake; prefers wet places
Thamnophis proximus, Western ribbon snake - yellow- or reddish-striped snake of temperate woodlands and grasslands to tropics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Wild vines entangled the trees and flaunted in their faces; brambles and briers caught their clothes as they passed; the garter snake glided across their path; the spotted toad hopped and waddled before them; and the restless catbird mewed at them from every thicket.
Growing up off Fruitville and Cattlemen roads, the young Crum caught small garter snakes. "Never in my wildest dreams did I think when I grew up I would be catching 17-foot pythons in the Everglades," Crum says.
Toads and garter snakes were plentiful, as were salamanders under the rotting logs littering the forest floor.
At some localities, birds appear relatively frequently in the diet of Western Terrestrial Garter Snakes. On Mitlenatch Island, British Columbia, Campbell (1969) reported that this garter snake species readily preyed on nestling Glaucous-winged Gulls (Lams glaucescens) and the eggs and nestlings of Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus).
In a process called brumation, certain cold-blooded animals such as garter snakes, turtles, and other reptiles and amphibians don't sleep, but rather they slow down or cease their movements for the entire winter season.
Garter snakes are known for their hibernacula -- rather, they're known for freaking people out when they emerge en masse in spring (not to worry, they're harmless -- and beneficial).
20 said no species was immune to the fungal disease found already in wild species such as garter snakes, milk snakes, and vipers in the eastern United States, as well as three species in Europe.
Species like corn snakes, kingsnakes, garter snakes and rosy boas might be a better first choice.
Scaling the heights: thermally driven arboreality in garter snakes. Journal of Thermal Biology, 30, 179-185.
Since I used to collect garter snakes, this was no big deal--just get a stick and move him to the grass.
(161) There are number of pressing concerns about the effects of these long term transfers, including: concerns about effects on local communities and streams from the pumping of groundwater used for irrigation as a substitution for transferred surface water, impacts on Delta fish from a potential decrease in flows to the Sacramento River, and effects on giant garter snakes. (162)