chemical warfare

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Related to Gas warfare: poison gas

chemical warfare

n
(Military) warfare in which chemicals other than explosives are used as weapons, esp warfare using asphyxiating or nerve gases, poisons, defoliants, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chem′ical war′fare


n.
warfare with asphyxiating, poisonous, or corrosive gases, oil flames, etc.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chemical warfare

All aspects of military operations involving the employment of lethal and incapacitating munitions/agents and the warning and protective measures associated with such offensive operations. Since riot control agents and herbicides are not considered to be chemical warfare agents, those two items will be referred to separately or under the broader term "chemical," which will be used to include all types of chemical munitions/agents collectively. Also called CW. See also chemical agent; chemical defense; chemical dose; chemical environment; chemical weapon; riot control agent.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemical warfare - warfare using chemical agents to kill or injure or incapacitate the enemy
war, warfare - the waging of armed conflict against an enemy; "thousands of people were killed in the war"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dulce Et Decorum Est dealt with the horrors of gas warfare: "If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace "Behind the wagon that we flung him in, "And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, "His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin; "If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood "Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, "Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud."
Gas warfare took place openly for the first and only time in history (though since then gas has been used surreptitiously in some wars).
This Elgin-based unit went on to face some very difficult struggles, including the horrors of gas warfare.
The doctrine of strategic deterrence maintaining stockpiles of powerful weapons to keep a similarly armed adversary in check didn't begin with nuclear weapons; rather, it emerged from gas warfare in World War I.
In addition to the holdings of the Gas Defense Plant museum, crates of gas warfare materiel recovered in England, France, and Italy (including American, French, British, Italian, Russian, German, and Austrian collections) were also shipped to Edgewood Arsenal.
gas warfare and transportation have become important factors and may have great influence in securing ultimate victory.
The British expressed outrage at Germany's use of poison gas but responded by creating their own gas warfare capability.
Volume one of a three volume set, this specialty reference book documents uniforms, headgear, weapons, gas warfare materials, and telephone and communications equipment used in the German army in WWI.
This amazing 3-volume work by Johan Somers should have been titled, "Everything you ever wanted to know about the Imperial German Army, but were afraid to ask." The books The Imperial German Armies in Field Grey Seen Through Period Photographs, 1907-1918: Uniforms, Headgear, Weapons, Gas Warfare, Telephone and Communications Equipment, Infantry, Jager, Schutzen, Radfahrer, Mountain Troops and Machine Gunners Volume II, Cavalry, Artillery, Pioneers, Transport, Train, Medical, Miscellaneous Formations Volume III, follows on the heels of the publication of five successful works detailing specific branches of the Imperial German and Russian armies just in time for the 100th Anniversary of World War I.
Secretary of State John Kerry echoed the President's message when, in Senate testimony in 2013, he noted that gas warfare during World War I caused most of the world to ban chemical weapons.
The authors term push poll ads "the poison gas warfare of political campaigns" Negative ads "demobilize citizens ...
From "Facts and Fancies about Gas Warfare," originally published in the February 1929 issue of Technology Review.