water vapor

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Related to Gaseous water: water vapour, water vapor

water vapor

n.
Water in a gaseous state, especially when diffused as a vapor in the atmosphere and at a temperature below boiling point.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wa′ter va`por


n.
water in the gaseous state, esp. as produced by evaporation at temperatures below the boiling point.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

water vapor

Water in its gaseous state, especially in the atmosphere and at a temperature below the boiling point.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.water vapor - water in a vaporous form diffused in the atmosphere but below boiling temperaturewater vapor - water in a vaporous form diffused in the atmosphere but below boiling temperature
cloud - a visible mass of water or ice particles suspended at a considerable altitude
vapor, vapour - a visible suspension in the air of particles of some substance
spray - water in small drops in the atmosphere; blown from waves or thrown up by a waterfall
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
vesihöyry
ūdens tvaiks
References in periodicals archive ?
These gaseous water molecules are collected and "swept" away using a small fraction of the very dry air produced in the dryer, called regeneration or "re-gen air." Heatless adsorption dryers remove humidity from the airstream and regenerate themselves by switching between two desiccant "towers" approximately every four minutes.
However frigid air is mixed in, and this cold air has very little capacity to hold gaseous water vapor, orders of magnitude less than that on a warm summer day at sea level.