gastrolith

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gas·tro·lith

 (găs′trə-lĭth′)
n.
1. A pathological stony mass formed in the stomach; gastric calculus.
2. A small stone found in the stomach of some reptiles, fish, and birds that aids in digestion by helping grind ingested food material.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gastrolith

(ˈɡæstrəlɪθ)
n
(Pathology) pathol a stone in the stomach; gastric calculus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gas•tro•lith

(ˈgæs trə lɪθ)

n.
a calculous concretion in the stomach.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

gas·tro·lith

n. gastrolito, concreción en el estómago.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
This rubber 'slip slop' was found amongst its stomach content remains, along with the usual stone 'gastroliths' and some fishing net.
Like some modern birds, it may have used gastroliths, or stomach stones, to break down hard foods like seeds, and it was likely a plant-eater, said Wang.
Fossilized tracks and trails, fossil eggs, fossilized turd or dung and gastroliths (smooth rounded stones that were swallowed by large planteating dinosaurs to aid digestion) are other, less common, forms of fossils.
"The discovery of the gastroliths associated with this plesiosaur specimen were particularly exciting because most plesiosaur gastroliths are found associated with the long-neck morphotype," Schmeisser explained, adding that "the stones described in our paper are much lighter and smaller than those found in long-neck plesiosaurs."
In crayfish these deposits are a pair of disc-like structures known as gastroliths, located on both sides of the stomach wall (Travis, 1960, 1963a, b; Travis and Friberg, 1963a).
The digestive tracts of both plesiosaurs also contained dozens of gastroliths, stones that paleontologists speculate were used to grind up hard-shelled prey and thereby aid digestion.
The only non-molluscan fauna include two small crayfish gastroliths. All Loess deposits are considered strictly eolian in origin.
Stomachs with calcified gastroliths were subsequently disregarded, thereby effectively eliminating from the present study all premolt lobsters from stage [D.sup.1.5] (=[D.sub.0]) on (Aiken, 1980).
One section I found most fascinating was Chapter Six on gastroliths ("stomach stones").
You can locate the homes of big, crayfish-eating trout by keeping an open eye for gastroliths. Crayfish require a large amount of calcium to build their shells.