gate control theory

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gate control theory

A theory which states that pain may be relieved by the application of pressure to certain parts of the body because the brain receives messages concerning pressure faster that it receives messages concerning pain. In other words, once a pressure message has reached the brain, the “gateway” for further (i.e. pain) messages is closed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gate control theory of pain, developed in the 1960s, suggested pain could be controlled by activating certain nerves to interrupt pain signals.
Melzack's (1999) gate control theory of pain is the most commonly studied theory in contemporary healthcare practice.
Based on Gate Control Theory of pain and previous experiences; parameters such as culture, stress and psychological factors have a powerful influence on the perception of pain by a patient and it effect pain signals perceived by the brain.
In the recent years, few innovative products were developed taking into consideration this gate control theory of pain. These products work on the principle of masking the pain rather than eliminating the cause of pain.
Dickenson, "Gate control theory of pain stands the test of time," British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol.
Reduction of pain by acupressure at BL32 acupoint can be justified by the gate control theory of pain. According to this theory, acupoints are the locations of sensory receptors with thin afferent fibers (A-delta and C-fibers) placed in the muscles.
1978 The Gate Control Theory of Pain. Retrieved 2010 from http://www.ncbi.
The work of Melzack and Wall (1965) (1) and their proposal of the gate control theory of pain, such that signals from large sensory fibres decrease the transmission of neuropathic pain signals from small fibre afferents (fast blocks slow), provides a window to the underlying physiology.