gate control theory

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gate control theory

A theory which states that pain may be relieved by the application of pressure to certain parts of the body because the brain receives messages concerning pressure faster that it receives messages concerning pain. In other words, once a pressure message has reached the brain, the “gateway” for further (i.e. pain) messages is closed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gate control theory of pain (GCTP) suggests the pain signal can be inhibited through sensory stimulation.
Based on Gate Control Theory of pain and previous experiences; parameters such as culture, stress and psychological factors have a powerful influence on the perception of pain by a patient and it effect pain signals perceived by the brain.
In the recent years, few innovative products were developed taking into consideration this gate control theory of pain.
According to the gate control theory of pain, one's thoughts, beliefs, and emotions may affect how much pain is felt from a given physical sensation.
The work of Melzack and Wall (1965) (1) and their proposal of the gate control theory of pain, such that signals from large sensory fibres decrease the transmission of neuropathic pain signals from small fibre afferents (fast blocks slow), provides a window to the underlying physiology.