Gates


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Gates: Bill Gates, Logic gates

gate 1

 (gāt)
n.
1. A structure that can be swung, drawn, or lowered to block an entrance or a passageway.
2.
a. An opening in a wall or fence for entrance or exit.
b. The structure surrounding such an opening, such as the monumental or fortified entrance to a palace or walled city.
3.
a. A doorway or walkway in a terminal, as at an airport, through which passengers proceed when embarking or disembarking.
b. A waiting area inside a terminal, abutting such a doorway or walkway.
4. A means of access: the gate to riches.
5. A mountain pass.
6. The total paid attendance or admission receipts at a public event: a good gate at the football game.
7. A device for controlling the passage of water or gas through a dam or conduit.
8. The channel through which molten metal flows into a shaped cavity of a mold.
9. Sports A passage between two upright poles through which a skier must go in a slalom race.
10. A logic gate.
tr.v. gat·ed, gat·ing, gates
1. Chiefly British To confine (a student) to the grounds of a college as punishment.
2. Electronics To select part of (a wave) for transmission, reception, or processing by magnitude or time interval.
3. To furnish with a gate: "The entrance to the rear lawn was also gated" (Dean Koontz).
Idioms:
get the gate Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
give (someone) the gate Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.

[Middle English, from Old English geat.]

gate 2

 (gāt)
n. Archaic
1. A path or way.
2. A particular way of acting or doing; manner.

[Middle English, from Old Norse gata; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

Gates

 (gāts), Horatio 1728?-1806.
American Revolutionary general who became a hero after winning the Battle of Saratoga (1777) but suffered a humiliating defeat at Camden, South Carolina (1780).

Gates

, William Henry Known as "Bill." Born 1955.
American computer software designer and business executive who cofounded Microsoft in 1975 and as chairman built it into one of the largest computer software manufacturers in the world.

Gates

(ɡeɪts)
n
1. (Biography) Bill, full name William Henry Gates. born 1955, US computer-software executive and philanthropist; founder (1976) of Microsoft Corporation
2. (Biography) Henry Louis. born 1950, US scholar and critic, who pioneered African-American studies in such works as Figures in Black (1987)
3. (Biography) Horatio. ?1728–1806, American Revolutionary general: defeated the British at Saratoga (1777)

Gates

(geɪts)

n.
1. Horatio, 1728–1806, American Revolutionary general, born in England.
2. William (Bill), born 1956, U.S. computer software entrepreneur.

gates

Two solid uniform flagpoles, alternately blue or red with flags of the same color; used to define twisting slalom courses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gates - United States computer entrepreneur whose software company made him the youngest multi-billionaire in the history of the United States (born in 1955)Gates - United States computer entrepreneur whose software company made him the youngest multi-billionaire in the history of the United States (born in 1955)
References in classic literature ?
The gates and shops were all closed, only here and there round the taverns solitary shouts or drunken songs could be heard.
The gates were not opened upon this day, for the Sheriff was determined to carry through the hanging of Will Stutely undisturbed.
Has an order been given to close the town gates, Monseigneur?
Keys did I carry, the rustiest of all keys; and I knew how to open with them the most creaking of all gates.
It was evident that they constituted a guard detailed for the gate beside which they slept, and it was equally evident that the gates were guarded and the city watched much more carefully than Turan had believed.
I walked slowly through the gates, but when I was without the gates the anguish that took me because of my burnt hand was more than I could bear.
I am the Guardian of the Gates, and since you demand to see the Great Oz I must take you to his Palace.
The Army of Glinda the Good looked very grand and imposing when it assembled at daybreak before the palace gates.
Gates was a comparatively recent addition to his list of friends, a New York newspaperman who had come to England a few months before to act as his paper's London correspondent.
Even such world-old cities as ancient Aaanthor were as yet undreamed of when the races lived that built such gates as these.
Hither he drove and found the gates with their doors opened wide, and the great bar down--for the gatemen kept them open so as to let those of their comrades enter who might be flying towards the ships.
There is no safe way," replied the black, "and even if we reach the gates we shall have to fight.