Gatling gun

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Gatling gun

n.
A machine gun having a cluster of barrels that are fired in sequence as the cluster is rotated.

[After Richard Jordan Gatling.]

Gatling gun

(ˈɡætlɪŋ)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (sometimes not capital) a hand-cranked automatic machine gun equipped with a rotating cluster of barrels that are fired in succession using brass cartridges
[C19: named after R. J. Gatling (1818–1903), its US inventor]

Gat′ling gun`

(ˈgæt lɪŋ)
n.
an early type of machine gun consisting of a cluster of barrels around an axis that is rotated by a hand crank, with each barrel fired once during each rotation.
[1860–65, Amer.; after R. J. Gatling (1818–1903), U.S. inventor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gatling gun - an early form of machine gun having several barrels that fire in sequence as they are rotatedGatling gun - an early form of machine gun having several barrels that fire in sequence as they are rotated
machine gun - a rapidly firing automatic gun (often mounted)
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References in classic literature ?
He might fairly have been compared, in action, to a rapid-firing Gatling gun; while Smith was a hundred-ton cannon, and Lockwood was the maker of the ammunition.
No one knows how those Gatlings got there, but just the sight of them deterred the rioters from looting the Times.
For the next 40 years, the Gatling appeared in every conflict involving major powers including the Russo-Turkish War, the Zulu War, the American Indian Wars and the Spanish-American War in which Gatlings played a significant role during the assault on San Juan Hill.
Patented in 1862, declared obsolete and scrapped by the US military in 1911, rediscovered and transformed in the 1940s as the deadly answer to supersonic aerial gunnery, and now made once again as the Model 1877 Bulldog, the Gatling gun's comeback is unique in the annals of military ordnance.
The only Gatlings used by the Army were a dozen purchased by Federal General Benjamin F.
Unlike earlier Gatlings, the barrel unit of the Bulldog actually moves within the bronze casing, thus headspacing is easily effected by simply adjusting the round nut on the rear of the cascabel housing.
In a letter written 10 years after his gun first appeared, Gatling summed up his original motivation.
Those early powder-burning Gatlings had six barrels and fired .
One can only surmise the outcome of that fight would have been very different had any (or all) of those Gatlings been turned loose on the attacking Indians.