Gaudier-Brzeska


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Gaudier-Brzeska

(French ɡodjebʒɛska)
n
(Biography) Henri (ɑ̃ri), original name Henri Gaudier. 1891–1915, French vorticist sculptor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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His reason for dropping them are evident when one looks at the uselessly tiny reductions of Davenport's renderings of the Gaudier-Brzeska works in "The Bowmen of Shu" and the botched collages included in "Apples and Pears." Davenport explains: "The designer [of Apples and Pears] understood the collages to be gratuitous illustrations having nothing to do with anything, reduced them all to burnt toast, framed them with nonsensical lines, and sabotaged my whole enterprise.
On the top floor you will find the most extensive display of drawings and sculpture by Henri Gaudier-Brzeska you will find anywhere.
Davenport summons and rechannels dormant energies released by his archival subjects--the Vorticist art of Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, the discovery of the Aurignacian cave paintings at Lascaux, and the utopian project of Charles Fourier.
Drawing on the Ingram Collection of Modern British Art, 'Ten Years: A Century of Art', curated by Peter Hall and Jo Baring, celebrates the Lightbox's 10th anniversary and features works by key 20th-century artists, including Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, Barbara Hepworth, and Eric Ravilious.
Likewise, Tate Modern's 2009 centennial retrospective saw non-Futurist works--by Georges Braque, Robert Delaunay, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, and others--upstage many of their Italian counterparts; Futurist innovations appeared less radical than derivative, with even Boccioni's pioneering experiments wilting somewhat in the wake of Picasso's example.
The dramatis personae include many of the usual suspects--Eliot, Woolf, Marinetti, Hulme--and a few new faces--Wilfred Owen, H.D., Henri Gaudier-Brzeska. Modernism, Cultural Production, and the British Avant-Garde makes an ambitious argument for reconsidering modernism's relation to its context of bourgeois, capitalist production.
There are two linear drawings by the Futurist Gino Severini which are clearly influenced by Picasso's style of the early 1920s (a frustration of this exhibition is that few of the exhibits are dated), but mostly these works are by the first wave of British modernists - Paul Nash, CRW Nevinson, William Roberts, Edward Wadsworth, Percy Wyndham Lewis and the London-based Frenchman Henri Gaudier-Brzeska prominent among them.
Boccioni was not the only artist casualty of the war --his Futurist colleague Antonio Sant'Elia, and fellow modernists Henri Gaudier-Brzeska and Franz Marc all died at the front.
Complementing these objects are key canvases, woodcuts, and watercolors, as well as select printed material, from Pound's monograph on Henri Gaudier-Brzeska to issues of Blast opened up to Lewis's fiery editorials.
These related claims that poets, like other propaganda artists, work in the service of a regime, passing on a leader's ideas to the masses, shock readers of Pound's London poetry and criticism, accustomed to his sense in 1915 that "it is the artist's job to express what is 'true for himself,'" and that "the man who tries to express his age, instead of expressing himself, is doomed to destruction" (Gaudier-Brzeska 102).
The artists I admire - Modigliani, Gaudier-Brzeska, Edward Burra, Stanley Spencer - all these people pursued their ideal regardless.