Gaugamela


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Gau·ga·me·la

 (gô′gə-mē′lə)
An ancient village of Assyria east of Nineveh. Alexander the Great defeated the Persians under Darius III here in 331 bc.

Gau•ga•me•la

(ˌgɔ gəˈmi lə)

n.
an ancient village in Assyria, E of Nineveh: site of defeat of the Persians by Alexander the Great 331 b.c., often called “battle of Arbela.”
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According to a foreign ministry statement, Bamrani attended the press conference, which was held by the University of Udine in the Romanian capital, to discuss "the archaeological project in the land of Nineveh" and the new discoveries in the Kurdistan region, where the team of the University of Udine managed, after several months of efforts to trace the traces of Alexander Macedonian and locate (Battle of Gaugamela).
How Darius conducted himself in the second decisive battle of Gaugamela is described by Greek historian Arrian.
Last year, he published his second book Alexander the Great in Erbil: The Military Battle of Gaugamela and the Political Victory at Arbela.
Specifically, the authors repeat this lackluster approach in their discussions of several other battles including Gaugamela, Adrianople, Yarmuk, Midway, Kursk, and the least convincing selection in this book--the battle to secure Objective Peach.
Olympic Champion Dan Gable's wrestling career, Alexander the Great's Battle of Gaugamela, Napoleon's Ulm-Austerlitz Campaign, or even Wayne Gretzky's NHL hockey performances were the products of dominance.
Isto e possivel de se argumentar com base em duas estrategias investigativas: 1) a comparacao entre as apreciacoes filosoficas do desejo de conquista de Alexandre e Trajano, feitas por Arriano e Diao Cassio; 2) uma analise comparada dos vicios de Alexandre e Trajano, sendo os vicios do ultimo apresentados por Diao Cassio momentos antes de sua narrativa sobre a conquista de Adiabene (distrito que incluia Gaugamela, onde Alexandre derrotara Dario III) (STADTER 1980, p.
The warrior's greatest victory was at the Battle of Gaugamela, now in northern Iraq, in 331 BC.
He left this formidable inheritance to his son, Alexander, who became king in 336bc.Alexander first destroyed the continuing Persian hold over the Greek cities of Asia Minor by his victory over them at the battle of Issus in 333 bc.Two years later, at Gaugamela, Persian power was decisively broken when the last Achaemenes, Darius III, fled to Bactria, where he was murdered.