gauge theory

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Related to Gauge invariance: Gauge symmetry, Gauge transformation, Gauge group

gauge theory

n. Physics
Any of various theories based upon a gauge symmetry. Current fundamental theories, such as the standard model of particle physics, are gauge theories.

gauge theory

n
(Nuclear Physics) physics a type of theory of elementary particles designed to explain the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions in terms of exchange of virtual particles
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are gravitational searches for Lorentz violations with matter and astrophysics, the emergence of gauge invariance from nambu models, astroparticles and tests of Lorentz invariance, an angstrom-scale short-range Yukawa-interaction search using neutron interferometry and the neutron Fizeau effect, and the impact of Lorentz violation on the Klein tunneling effect.
This approach will greatly expand the gauge invariance of the system.
Mills, Conservation of Isotopic Spin and Isotopic Gauge Invariance, Phys.
This type of additional gauge invariance is typical of fields in some non-trivial module of the structure group.
A failure of gauge invariance may also appear in different contexts, which are introduced in the next sections.
Keywords: Generalized Yang-Mills theories, affine connections, gauge invariance.
Skoric, (Mis-)handling Gauge Invariance in the Theory of the Quantum Hall Effect.
Gauge invariance theory and the development of ideas from it over the past half century are explored by US physicists in 19 papers, a few of which have been published elsewhere.
Acoustical Imaging: Techniques and Applications for Engineers introduces the basic physics of acoustics and acoustical imaging, before progressing to more advanced topics such as 3D and 4D imaging, elasticity theory, gauge invariance property of acoustic equation of motion and acoustic metamaterials.
Parton Densities in Quantum Chromodynamics: Gauge Invariance, Path-Dependence and Wilson Lines
Just the same situation comes about in the weak interaction [3], where the obstructive role of reference systems stimulates the appearance of auxiliary "principles" like gauge invariance with its artificial group structure that can only explain the already known results of experiments rather than predict them.
Thirdly, even if the first two points were met, physics does not admit local gauge invariance for all predicates, but only for a very limited number, so it could not be the solution to the general philosophical problem.