Gaulish


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Related to Gaulish: Gaelic, Gælic

Gaul·ish

 (gô′lĭsh)
adj.
Of or relating to Gaul, the ancient Gauls, or their language or customs.
n.
The Celtic language of ancient Gaul.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gaulish

(ˈɡɔːlɪʃ)
n
1. (Languages) the extinct language of the pre-Roman Gauls, belonging to the Celtic branch of the Indo-European family
2. (Historical Terms) the extinct language of the pre-Roman Gauls, belonging to the Celtic branch of the Indo-European family
adj
of or relating to ancient Gaul, the Gauls, or their language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Gaul•ish

(ˈgɔ lɪʃ)

n.
1. the extinct Celtic language of ancient Gaul.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Gaul, its inhabitants, or their language.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Curio the Younger, who's candidature for the office of tribune Caesar surreptitiously supported with Gaulish money, hit upon a new campaigning scheme.
Caesar cited the Gaulish Mars as a god of healing in his De Bello gallico, and in Mars' various incarnations throughout Romano-Celtic regions, he was portrayed (epigraphically and/or in art) as a peaceful, beneficent healer, associated variously with healing eye diseases, protection, or ensuring fertility.
A late seventh century account of a pilgrimage by a Gaulish bishop named Arculf is illustrative.
Thus, it was that a Gaulish army of 250,000 could advance on Rome during the period of Marius at a steady pace of what the average member could cover on foot in a given day.
These papers traverse a wide geography, dealing with issues of relationships, linkages, literacies, and the social context of interactions with Latin of a smorgasbord of antique and medieval languages, including Middle Welsh, Greek, Old Swedish, and related Scandinavian languages, Old and Middle Irish, Old English, a number of Romance languages (such as Castilian, Leonese, Old and Middle French, Gaulish Latin), and Old High German.
Nevertheless, there is more to Pyongyang than a Gaulish village indomitably resisting globalization and following a special set of rules for communal life that was drawn up by its political leaders.
Over the course of the next few hours, we did the whole history tour - Ancient Rome, Greece, Egypt and the Viking invaders as well as more recent history, with Asterix's "Gaulish Village" at the heart of the site.
Although Livy does not describe the Romans, he is able to depict aptly the ambiguous emotions of the anxious, desperate and simultaneously determined and courageous Gaulish warriors.
Pte Philip Wilkinson, aged 26, of 3 Para, has been taking part in Exercise Gaulish Eagle at an urban warfare training centre in north-east France.
Two other similar adjectives are Tolletan 'for the city of Toledo, Spain' (1395) and Gallican 'Gallic, Gaulish' (1425).
At first, Publius achieved some success with his Gaulish light cavalry, who outmanoeuvred the heavily armoured Parthians cataphracts.