Geber


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Geber

(ˈdʒiːbə)
n
(Biography) Latinized form of Jabir, assumed in honour of Jabir ibn Hayyan by a 14th-century alchemist, probably Spanish: he described the preparation of nitric and sulphuric acids
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References in periodicals archive ?
New publications have highlighted the complexities inherent in studying famine as a calamitous event with intersecting biological and social factors (e.g., Geber and Murphy 2012; Yaussy et al.
Tolerance and avoidance mechanisms of abiotic stress need not be mutually exclusive and both may function in natural plant populations (Geber and Dawson, 1997; Heschel and Riginos, 2005).
Bioarchaeologist Dr Jonny Geber, from University College Cork, looked at the suffering of children who lost their parents in the Famine or who were taken from their mothers in the workhouses.
Pamela Geber, M.F.A., is in the Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
49b But he did not sail because the ships were wrecked at Ezion- geber.
Geber (2000) provides a contemporary definition of distance education as any formal approach to learning in which the majority of the instruction occurs while educator and learner are at a distance from each other.
According to Geber, the top three unethical acts in the workplace are
In January, German private equity investor Cornelius Geber said a consortium planning a bid for TNT was almost ready, but has not said anything since.
Works by choreographers David Dorfman and Sara Rudner will be performed by dancers Pamela Geber and Eric Handman at the University of Oregon this weekend.
Christian Geber from Germany was almost kicked to death while waiting for a bus.
The expression of [Delta] has been shown to be under genetic control in cool-season grasses (Johnson et al., 1990), wheat (Condon et al., 1987) and in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (Ehleringer, 1988), and is a heritable trait which can be altered in breeding programs (Geber and Dawson, 1990, unpublished data).
In a chapter that by itself constitutes a very useful and succinct narrative of current understanding concerning the history of Latin alchemy from the Middle Ages to the early seventeenth century, he traces the origins of Starkey's thought in earlier alchemical tradition, with special reference to corpuscular ideas in the medieval Latin alchemy of "Geber" (to the elucidation of which Newman's earlier work has largely contributed), Lullian alchemy, and the alchemical teaching of Paracelsus and Van Helmont.