coming of age

(redirected from Genbaku)

coming of age

n
1. the moment when a person or thing reaches an important stage of development
2.
a. the time when a person reaches legal adulthood
b. (as modifier): a coming-of-age ceremony.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Hiroshima she visited the Genbaku Dome or Peace Memorial.
Yet, the most obviously relevant and fraught memoryscape and related memory rite in Hiroshima (and Japan) is the variously called the A-Bomb Dome, Hiroshima Peace Memorial, and Genbaku Domu.
Genbaku to Kenetsu: America-jin Kisha-tachi ga Mita Hiroshima, Nagasaki [Atomic Bombs and Censorship: Hiroshima and Nagasaki seen by American journalist].
TOP PHOTO: Genbaku Domu, commonly called the Atomic Bomb Dome, is part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, above (from left): Remnants of a tricycle and helmet exposed to nuclear detonation are on display at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum.
To mark the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing, Mick Broderick and another academic Stuart Bender were given rare access to film inside the Genbaku -- or A-Bomb -- Dome, Hiroshima's former industrial promotional hall, which was almost directly below the blast but remained standing.
The photoA[degrees] graphs will display not only Hiroshima's experience of the world's first nuclear bombing, but the city's reconstruction, internaA[degrees]tional conventions and visits of world leaders and Hiroshima prefecture's popular tourist attractions including two world heritage sites, namely the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, known as Genbaku Dome in Japan, and the Itsukushima Shrine.
The photographs will display not only Hiroshima's experience of the world's first nuclear bombing, but the city's reconstruction, international conventions and visits of world leaders and Hiroshima Prefecture's popular tourist attractions including two world heritage sites, namely the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, known as Genbaku Dome in Japan, and the Itsukushima Shrine.
Outside the museum, the Atomic Bomb Dome or Genbaku dome stands as a stark and powerful symbol of world peace after the destruction left by the first atom bomb.
In an article titled Hiroshima ni jinrui hatsu no genbaku, or "The first atomic bomb in human history hit Hiroshima," The Yomiuri stated that future research on nuclear power should be viewed as fundamentally good for the future of Japan, and emphasized that the Japanese people had an obligation to promote the peaceful use of nuclear technology rather than the evil use of nuclear weaponry precisely because Japan was the only country that had been affected by the atomic bomb.
In the preface to "Genbaku shishu" (Collection of Atomic Bomb Poems) published in the same month, however, Toge wrote that he would dedicate his work to "people throughout the world who abhor atomic bombs."
to stand testament to all the nuclear test sites of the world" and stands "as a testimony to all victims of nuclear colonialism", thus differentiating Bikini Atoll from, for example, the World Heritage listed Hiroshima Genbaku Dome memorial site.