gender-blind

(redirected from Gender blind)
Related to Gender blind: pansexual

gender-blind

adj
(Sociology) not discriminating on the basis of gender, or not making a distinction between the sexes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
There are times and places that being gender blind to bona fide differences like the fact that some soldiers have outdoor plumbing and some soldiers don't, just isn't helpful.
Both agreed that it is important to create an atmosphere where demand is "gender blind".
'However, the language used in the draft bill is gender blind. Throughout the bill, apart from when it talks about reproductive rights, the word 'him' has been used and there is no mention of women.
Alongside the quantitative comparison of salary data, the Equal Salary Certification methodology involves a qualitative audit of management commitment to equal pay principles, of employee perception of that commitment and of HR policies and practices to identify any potential gender blind spots, and recommends actions to mitigate them.
It goes on to recommend that the gender neutral and gender blind language is evident in the law so much so that the words like 'workmen' and 'he' used for the workers are made more neutral, instead.
Coming up the ranks at a time when speaking out was not the norm in the business world--particularly for women in real estate--Silverstein said she was gender blind during early years.
Speaking to Marian Finucane on RTE Radio 1 on Saturday, she said while she disagrees with Hook's comments, she considers him one of the most "gender blind" people she has worked with.
Millennials are more gender blind than previous generations, according to The Intelligence Group study.
"However, we want to do more 50/50 gender casting and more gender blind casting," she adds, explaining that while many Shakespearean roles might be gender neutral, such as Doctor in Macbeth, many directors would automatically recruit a male.
This is prioritised, she explains as a result of a 2014 review of the process which indicated, "women in Africa face pervasive structural, attitudinal and systemic challenges in the private and public sphere, resulting in their unequal participation in critical development initiatives yet gender equality is a legitimate development objective of itself either discriminatory, gender blind or gender-neutral laws and policies."
It is a strategy for ensuring that financial products, policies and programmes are neither gender blind nor biased in their design, implementation, monitoring or evaluation at all levels of engagement in order that women and men benefit equitably and that inequality in the provision of financial services is eliminated." (GRH, 2013:2)