gender-blind

(redirected from Gender-blindness)

gender-blind

adj
(Sociology) not discriminating on the basis of gender, or not making a distinction between the sexes
References in periodicals archive ?
Using Judith Herman's work on the three stages of trauma recovery, Getz addresses the systemic violent oppressions of women and the gender-blindness of transitional justice processes in South Korea.
This "gender-blindness" reflects a more general "dearth of gendered analysis of migration by political scientists." The overall "securitization" of immigration as an issue in the EU has resulted when the claims to secure Europe's borders clearly take precedence over the competing security claims of women and men seeking refugee protection within Europe.
Disappointingly, Chapter Six, by Alister McGrath, titled "On Tolkien, the Inklings--and Lewis' blindness to gender," focuses primarily on the Inklings, mentioning the writer's female friends and his gender-blindness in only one short paragraph near the end of the piece.
As a feminist scholar, I strongly call for a boycott of gender-blindness in development practices as well as in policy processes.
It is envisaged that the harmonised and engendered training manual would replace gender-blindness with gender awareness and gender responsiveness for transformation of gender relations in school management within the vision of the Somaliland/Puntland/Galmudug gender mainstreaming strategy for gender equality in education.
The Future Laboratory, which compiled the research report on behalf of Confused.com, has identified that the 'battle for gender-blindness' will take over from the fight for equality, or feminism.
These differences in the treatment of men and women existed despite proclamations of gender-blindness by the fund's staff.
"Gender-blindness comes down to decisions by the government," she says.
On a women's prison, she writes: "[it is] about the saddest place I've ever been, largely due to its climate of suppressed rage, depression, shame, and secrecy." These are the very differences the gender-blindness of the Michigan DOC cannot see.
Given the gender-blindness of the planning process, large dam projects typically build on the imbalance in existing gender relations.
In her final chapter, Moscovici contests the "gender-blindness" of Foucault's 1980 introduction to nineteenth-century hermaphrodite Herculine Barbin's journal.
This however was not 'gender-blindness' as Wilson argues, but an awareness and active suppression of gender difference arising from an intellectual commitment to abstract generalizations, disembodied reasoning, and a basically Freudian view, which saw women, despite their surface differences, essentially as men without a penis.