genocide

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Related to Genocides: Armenian Genocide

gen·o·cide

 (jĕn′ə-sīd′)
n.
The systematic and widespread extermination or attempted extermination of a national, racial, religious, or ethnic group.

[Greek genos, race; see genə- in Indo-European roots + -cide.]

gen′o·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
gen′o·cid′al·ly adv.

genocide

(ˈdʒɛnəʊˌsaɪd)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policy of deliberately killing a nationality or ethnic group
[C20: from geno-, from Greek genos race + -cide]
ˌgenoˈcidal adj

gen•o•cide

(ˈdʒɛn əˌsaɪd)

n.
the deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group.
[1940–45; < Greek géno(s) race + -cide]
gen`o•cid′al, adj.

genocide

1. the deliberate and systematic extermination of a racial or national group.
2. an actor in this process. — genocidal, adj.
See also: Race
the killing of an entire people or of a very large number of a people. — genocidal, adj.
See also: Killing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genocide - systematic killing of a racial or cultural group
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

genocide

noun massacre, killing, murder, slaughter, holocaust, ethnic cleansing (euphemistic), carnage, extermination, mass murder, annihilation, pogrom, butchery, mass slaughter They have alleged that acts of genocide and torture were carried out.
Translations
إبادَه جَماعِيَّه
геноцид
genocida
folkemord
genocid
népirtásfajirtás
òjóîarmorîþjóðarmorð
genocidas
genocīds
ludobójstwo
genocída
genocid
genocid

genocide

[ˈdʒenəʊsaɪd] Ngenocidio m

genocide

[ˈdʒɛnəsaɪd] ngénocide m

genocide

nVölkermord m, → Genozid nt (geh)

genocide

[ˈdʃɛnəʊˌsaɪd] ngenocidio

genocide

(ˈdʒenəsaid) noun
the deliberate killing of a race of people.

gen·o·cide

n. genocidio, exterminación sistemática de un grupo étnico.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book, Genocide and Mass Atrocities in World History: Overview for Cambodian Classrooms, looks at the mass atrocities committed against Armenians in World War I, the Holocaust of World War II and more recent genocides in Cambodia, Bosnia and Rwanda.
Mr Erdogan said: "When you dig into massacres, genocides (and) torture., you will find those who cry 'genocide, democracy, freedom' against us."
"The history of the countries accusing Turkey of the "Armenian genocide" is full of genocides and murders of innocent people," he added.
ISLAMABAD -- The Embassy of the Republic of Azerbaijan in collaboration with the National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) organized a seminar on 'Conflicts, Genocides, Wars - Never again.
After a definition of genocide and a review of the development of the field of genocide studies, chapter-length cases reveal the facts behind eight genocides, from colonial genocides through the Armenian genocide, the Nazi genocides of Jews and Gypsies, the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, and genocides in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Sudan.
His main conclusion, developed in Chapter 3, is that genocides rely on founding narratives based on the belief that 'we' need to defend 'our' core identity from 'them'.
His ideas are used to place agency on the side of the Canadian and American governments not only as colonizing, but as putting in place structures of colonialism--but also to remind us of the agency of Indigenous peoples who resisted and adapted to domination and genocides. With reference to Wolfe's work, Woolford develops the notion of a colonial mesh, providing the image of a net that can expand or shrink and be tighter or looser in different geographical areas or concerning different aspects of life.
In chapter 6, Gangi moves away from discussing specific genocides in order to examine books in which authors deal with multiple genocides, but the structure of the chapters still follows the division into problematic, recommended with reservation, and recommended.
Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century
Other genocides may also be comfortingly conceptualised as 'uncivilised.' In reality, of course, the 'civilising progress' itself, in Australia and elsewhere, inherently involved acts of 'barbaric' cruelty (van Krieken 1999).
So let us end genocide as we know it -- by stopping genocides, but also by abandoning the crime of genocide.
In 2002 Carwyn himself took part in a debate in the Assembly on the Armenian Genocide. Now he advises that while remembering the victims of the Holocaust is not foreign policy, remembering the grandparents of Welsh Armenians who were massacred in the cruellest of genocides, is foreign policy.