genome

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ge·nome

 (jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.


ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.

genome

(ˈdʒiːnəʊm) or

genom

n
1. (Genetics) the full complement of genetic material within an organism
2. (Biology) all the genes comprising a haploid set of chromosomes
[C20: from German Genom, from Gen gene + (chromos)ome]
genomic adj

ge•nome

(ˈdʒi noʊm)

n.
a full haploid set of chromosomes with all its genes; the total genetic constitution of a cell or organism.
[1925–30; < German]
ge•no′mic, adj.

ge·nome

(jē′nōm)
The total amount of genetic information in the chromosomes of an organism, including its genes and DNA sequences. The genome of eukaryotes is made up of a single, haploid set of chromosomes that is contained in the nucleus of every cell and exists in two copies in the chromosomes of all cells except reproductive cells. The human genome is made up of about 30,000 genes. ♦ The scientific study of genomes is called genomics (jə-nō′mĭks).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genome - the ordering of genes in a haploid set of chromosomes of a particular organism; the full DNA sequence of an organism; "the human genome contains approximately three billion chemical base pairs"
ordering, ordination, order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
Translations
genom
genomiperimä
génállománygenom
erfðamengi
ゲノム
genoom
genom
genoma
genom
genom

genome

[ˈdʒiːnəʊm] Ngenoma m

genome

[ˈdʒiːnəʊm] ngénome m

genome

n (Biol) → Genom nt

genom

, genome
n. genoma, el conjunto básico completo de cromosomas haploides en un organismo.

genome

n genoma m; human — genoma humano
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the fact that on average the genomes of bonobos and chimpanzees are equally distant from human, analysis of the genome sequence of the bonobo revealed that for some particular parts of the genome, humans are closer to bonobos than to chimpanzees, while in other regions the human genome is closer to chimpanzees.
"It turns out with the haploid genomes, we missed most of human [genetic] variation," says Venter, who led the project to decode his own genome at the J.
In May 2004, the NHGRI awarded a grant to 454 Life Sciences to help fund the scale-up of 454 Life Sciences' technique toward the sequencing of larger genomes, starting with bacterial genomes, and to develop the company's ultraminiaturized technology as a method to sequence routinely individual human genomes.
The genomes of the viral isolate were sequenced to determine whether genetic changes were associated with increased pathogenicity and to assess whether the virus had acquired human influenza A genes.
"We're enhancing known information so that points of similarity between the genomes of each crop are highlighted," she says.
The players in the global digital genome market are aiming towards expanding their businesses in the global market by increasing the research and development expenditure for development of upgrades in the field of digital genomes.
melanogaster - a species with relatively simple genomes less like to hide variation - suggests that our own genomes, and those of the species we eat, are harboring an even larger store of medically and agriculturally important genetic variation.
But now scientists have figured out how to replicate the process, enabling humans to edit, with the utmost precision, specific genomes a the Holy Grail of genetic engineering for nearly 50 years.
To better understand these bacteria and develop more effective treatments, University of California San Diego researchers examined not just a single representative staph genome, but the "pan-genome"--the genomes of 64 different strains that differ in where they live, the types of hosts they infect, and their antibiotic resistance profiles.
An international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world's largest catalog of genomic differences among humans, providing researchers with powerful clues to help them establish why some people are susceptible to various diseases.
Now in its third generation of development, what began as genome analysis software for single human genomes nearly a decade ago, knoSYS has transformed into the most sophisticated genome interpretation and clinical decision support system available.
Richard Wilson, director of The Genome Institute and professor of genetics at Washington University, explained, the institute is focused on many of the problems associated with sequencing human genomes, which involve resolving complex repetitive or highly variable regions, improperly assembled areas, and regions for which no sequence exists in the current reference resource.

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