genre painting

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genre painting

A realistic style of painting in which everyday life forms the subject matter, as distinguished from religious or historical painting.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genre painting - a genre depicting everyday lifegenre painting - a genre depicting everyday life  
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1989 pastel-on-paper is along the line of indigenization of western genre works and shows the Madonna in Filipino baro't saya cradling the naked infant.
This genre works via individualized profiles and voices that must be heard, but it makes the size of your stage contingent on approval of the community--Likes, shares, and follows.
Conversations that I had with my mother growing up about responsibilities of athletes, or how every genre works and intersects with society and culture.
In the mid-1840s, he started painting his genre works that idealized labor and leisure on the river.
Usually the genre works if you have happy, shiny people and, 'Oh, no, we're pulling out the rug!' But what if they're just real people struggling with real things and what if we pull out the rug?
In the old days, the studios needed to tell theater owners and bookers what to expect, so films were clear-cut genre works: comedies, dramas, gangster movies, musicals, whatever.
One might expect that a press called 'Murder Mystery Press' would only produce genre works, but Farewell My Country in no way can be labeled as such, with its powerful coverage (based on history) of political events that took place under McCarthyism.
Z2's focus is eclectic, publishing genre works that feature fine storytelling and great hardcover production.
Hodge also shares the trio's bias against genre fiction, for the tacit assumption behind his genre-plus argument is that No Country is a minor work because it is a genre work. Moreover, both positions fail to address an important question that Hodge raises in his essay: Given McCarthy's literary position, his disregard for commercial fashion, and the prejudice against genre works, why would he pen a novel which bears such an alarming resemblance to a standard pulp fiction?
The answer is clearly yes, as provided in particular by the essays on specific genre works included in this collection.