Velvet Revolution

(redirected from Gentle Revolution)

velvet revolution

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the peaceful overthrow of a government, esp a communist government, as occurred in Czechoslovakia in late 1989
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Velvet Revolution

1989 –90 The peaceful end to Communist rule in Czechoslovakia. So named for the quiet resignation of the Communist government following massive but peaceful demonstrations.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

Velvet Revolution

n the Velvet Revolutiondie sanfte or samtene Revolution
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
It was acknowledged as a model by Germany, which had the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989; Czechoslovakia with its Velvet or Gentle Revolution also in 1989; and Hong Kong with its yellow umbrellas in 2014.
MIDLAND artists are amongst those starring in a special exhibition which aims to start a gentle revolution. Outside In: Central, at Compton Verney, near Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, is part of a national project based at the Pallant House Gallery in Sussex, which aims to provide a platform for artists who find it difficult to access the mainstream art world.
TWO COVENTRY artists are amongst those starring in a special exhibition which aims to start a gentle revolution.
"This gentle revolution," as Meyer fittingly characterizes it, "was sheer theater, ...
A nonviolent overthrow of the communist government in Czechoslovakia--which will become known as the Velvet Revolution (or the Gentle Revolution by its Slovak inhabitants)--will lead the following month to the naming of a playwright Vaclav Havel as the country's president.
His gentle revolution at St James's Park has stirred the passions of one who admits she does not fully comprehend the world's greatest game.
As he talks, Campbell is surrounded by the gentle revolution of 30 or 40 glass-domed anniversary clocks, most of them German-made.