Genys

Ge´nys

    (jē´nĭs)
n.1.(Zool.) See Gonys.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terms gnathos ([phrase omitted]) and genys ([phrase omitted]) for mandible explain terms like gnathology and m.
Vessel stove tiles have so far been little researched, with previous investigators having acknowledged that the specific nature of these tiles requires a separate study (Genys 1984, 43).
This age group--often referred to as GenYs or Millennials--has arrived in the workplace with a clear deficit in two critical areas: (1) accepting feedback and constructive criticism, and (2) accepting responsibility for mistakes.
“After 20+ years of presenting performing arts services in a variety of rented venues throughout the Gilbert and Mesa, it is with great joy we announce our first season in our new home, the ClearView Cultural Center,” says founder, Nancy Genys.”
"Credit unions are making this very easy to do on mobile, which can attract particularly the GenYs and millennials where big banks have significant inroads and who, demographically, might be most impacted by fees," Kilmer said.
See also Federal Commissioner of Taxation v Genys (1987) 17 FCR 495 (`Genys'); Green (1950) 81 CLR 313.
Genys, Blazing a Trail in the "New Frontier" of the CISG: Helen Kaminski Pty.
Hubley and Genys (1998) remarked that despite Congress' clear directive that charter schools must be in full compliance with Part B of the IDEA, there has been "no comprehensive effort to date to explore how charter school statutes and federal disability law fit together" (p.
During the early phases of population increase, oviposition is often highly clustered on a few trees despite the availability of adjacent, apparently healthy trees (Genys and Harman 1976, Krause 1994).