geodemographics


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geodemographics

(ˌdʒiːəʊdɛməˈɡræfɪks)
pl n
(Sociology) (functioning as singular) the study and grouping of the people in a geographical area according to socioeconomic criteria, esp for market research
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Privacy and the Phenetic Urge: Geodemographics and the Changing Spatiality of Local Practice." Pp.
What we need now is something that goes back to the traditional roots of geodemographics
They discuss the historical and methodological development of how neighborhoods are described, including the precursors to geodemographic classification, the emergence of geodemographics in the UK, and the types of neighborhoods in British cities identified by Mosaic, a geodemographic or neighborhood classification that consumer marketers have used over the past 40 years, then types of British residential neighborhoods defined by Mosaic, including the liberal metropolitan elite, municipal overspill estates, minority communities, the countryside, and coastal communities.
Dalton CM and Thatcher J (2015) Inflated granularity: Spatial "Big Data" and geodemographics. Big Data and Society 2(2): 1-15.
Jobber (2001) states that consumer purchase behaviour is influenced by (i) The buying situation, (ii) Personal influences (information processing, motivation, beliefs and attitudes, personality) and (iii) Social influences (Culture, social class, geodemographics, reference groups).
Using information such as geodemographics, behavioral data and psychographics, credit unions can get a clearer picture of their members' potential needs and act on them, he said.
(1989), "The Application of Geodemographics to Retailing-Meeting the Needs of the Catchment", Journal of the Market Research Society, 31 (1), 7-36.
* We conduct proper needs-based segmentation rather than relying on a priori nonsense such as socioeconomics (not all "A"s behave the same); demographics (not all 18 to 24-year-old women behave the same); geodemographics (not everyone in the same street behaves the same); and so on.
The authors conclude that their approach offers moderate to high potential to inform other sites, limited by intersite differences in data availability, geodemographics, and technical capacity.