geodesy

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ge·od·e·sy

 (jē-ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n.
The geologic science of the size and shape of the earth.

[New Latin geōdaesia, from Greek geōdaisiā : geō-, geo- + daiesthai, to divide; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

ge·od′e·sist n.

geodesy

(dʒɪˈɒdɪsɪ) or

geodetics

n
(Geological Science) the branch of science concerned with determining the exact position of geographical points and the shape and size of the earth
[C16: from French géodésie, from Greek geōdaisia, from geo- + daiein to divide]
geˈodesist n

ge•od•e•sy

(dʒiˈɒd ə si)

also ge•o•det•ics

(ˌdʒi əˈdɛt ɪks)

n.
the branch of applied mathematics that deals with the measurement of the shape and area of large tracts of country, the exact position of geographical points, and the curvature, shape, and dimensions of the earth.
[1560–70; < French géodésie < Greek geōdaisía=geō- geo- + -daisia, derivative of daíein to divide, distribute]
ge•od′e•sist, n.

geodesy

the branch of applied mathematics that studies the measurement and shape and area of large tracts, the exact position of geographical points, and the curvature, shape, and dimensions of the earth. Also called geodetics. — geodesist, n. — geodetic, geodetical, adj.
See also: Mathematics

geodesy

The scientific study of the size and shape of the Earth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geodesy - the branch of geology that studies the shape of the earth and the determination of the exact position of geographical pointsgeodesy - the branch of geology that studies the shape of the earth and the determination of the exact position of geographical points
geophysical science, geophysics - geology that uses physical principles to study properties of the earth
Translations
geodézie

geodesy

[dʒiːˈɒdɪsɪ] Ngeodesia f

geodesy

nGeodäsie f
References in periodicals archive ?
The software is still under development, but in initial tests it enabled centimeter-scale GPS positioning--including altitude--as often as 97 percent of the time, said Dorota Grejner-Brzezinska, professor of civil and environmental engineering and geodetic science at Ohio State University in Columbus.
One point of each type has been visited as part of the social programme during the "2nd Swiss Geodetic Science Week" held in Lithuania in September 2007.
In many ways, Danson's tale reads as an adventure story enhanced by details about the development of geodetic science and its instruments.
Leafing through the catalog, he noticed that Ohio State was one of the few universities with a geodetic science department.