Geoffrey


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Translations
Gottfried
Geoffroy

Geoffrey

[ˈdʒefrɪ] NGeofredo, Godofredo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Still impenetrably silent, Geoffrey replied by a nod of the head.
He turned again, with undiminished courtesy, to Geoffrey. "It is one of the duties of hospitality, Mr.
"I am sorry for this, Geoffrey. I hope and trust you will get to London in time."
There was something in Geoffrey's face--a strange mixture of doubt and bewilderment, of annoyance and hesitation--which was not to be accounted for as the natural result of the news that he had received.
"Is there something amiss, Geoffrey, besides this bad news about your father?" asked Arnold.
Instead of making a direct reply, Geoffrey lifted his mighty hand, and gave Arnold a friendly slap on the shoulder which shook him from head to foot.
(the third Norman king who ruled our land) there lived a monk called Geoffrey of Monmouth.
Geoffrey wrote his book in Latin, because at this time it was the language which most people could understand.
Geoffrey's chief hero is Arthur, and we may say that it is from this time that Arthur became a great hero of Romance.
Geoffrey begins his story long before the time of Arthur.
Geoffrey tells of many battles and of how the British fought, not only with the Saxons, but among themselves.
Geoffrey then says that he hands over the matter of writing about the later Welsh and Saxon kings to others, "Whom I bid be silent as to the kings of the Britons, seeing that they have not that book in the British speech which Walter, Archdeacon of Oxford, did convey hither out of Brittany, the which I have in this wise been at the pains of translating into the Latin speech."