George II

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George II 1

1683-1760.
King of Great Britain and Ireland and elector of Hanover (1727-1760). His 1743 victory at the Battle of Dettingen (a village of present-day south-central Germany) was the last time that a British monarch led his troops in the field.

George II 2

1890-1947.
King of Greece (1922-1923 and 1935-1947). He was deposed by a military junta in 1923 but returned to the throne in 1935 after a plebiscite.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

George II

n
1. (Biography) 1683–1760, king of Great Britain and Ireland and elector of Hanover (1727–60); son of George I. His victory over the French at Dettingen (1743) in the War of the Austrian Succession was the last appearance on a battlefield by a British king
2. (Biography) 1890–1947, king of Greece (1922–24; 1935–47). He was overthrown by the republicans (1924) and exiled during the German occupation of Greece (1941–45)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.George II - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)George II - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wiese is a faculty member of Georg August University G|ttingen, Germany.
Inga Zerr of the Georg August University in Gottingen and her coworkers describe their test in the Sept.
"Habitat isolation affects species diversity, having the greatest impact on parasitoids, thereby releasing pest insects from parasitism," report German researchers Andreas Kruess of University Fridericiana in Karlsruhe and Teja Tscharntke of Georg August University in Gottingen.