George

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George

 (jôrj)
n.
1. A jeweled figure of Saint George killing the dragon, used as an insignia of the Order of the Garter.
2. An English coin during the reign of Henry VIII, imprinted with a figure of Saint George.

George

, Saint Died c. ad 303.
Christian martyr and patron of England who, according to legend, slew a fearsome dragon.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

George

(dʒɔːdʒ)
n
1. (Biography) David Lloyd. See Lloyd George
2. (Biography) Sir Edward (Alan John), known as Eddie. 1938–2009, British economist, governor of the Bank of England (1993–2003)
3. (Biography) Henry. 1839–97, US economist: advocated a single tax on land values, esp in Progress and Poverty (1879)
4. (Biography) Saint. died ?303 ad, Christian martyr, the patron saint of England; the hero of a legend in which he slew a dragon. Feast day: April 23
5. (Biography) Stefan (Anton) (ˈʃtɛfan). 1868–1933, German poet and aesthete. Influenced by the French Symbolists, esp Mallarmé and later by Nietzsche, he sought for an idealized purity of form in his verse. He refused Nazi honours and went into exile in 1933

George

(dʒɔːdʒ)
n
(Aeronautics) informal Brit the automatic pilot in an aircraft
[C20: originally a slang name for an airman]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)

n. Idioms:
by George! Chiefly Brit. Informal. (an exclamation used to express astonishment, approval, etc.)
[1595–1600]

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)

n.
1. David Lloyd, Lloyd George, David.
2. Henry, 1839–97, U.S. economist.
3. Saint, died A.D. 303?, Christian martyr: patron saint of England.
4. Ste•fan An•ton (ˈʃtɛ fɑn ˈɑn toʊn) 1868–1933, German poet.
5. Lake, a lake in E New York. 36 mi. (58 km) long.

George

(dʒɔrdʒ)
n.
1. George I, 1660–1727, king of England 1714–27.
2. George II, 1683–1760, king of England 1727–60 (son of George I).
3. George III, 1738–1820, king of England 1760–1820 (grandson of George II).
4. George IV, 1762–1830, king of England 1820–30 (son of George III).
5. George V, 1865–1936, king of England 1910–36 (son of Edward VII).
6. George VI, 1895–1952, king of England 1936–1952 (son of George V).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.George - Christian martyrGeorge - Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)
2.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1936 to 1947George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1936 to 1947; he succeeded Edward VIII (1895-1952)
House of Windsor, Windsor - the British royal family since 1917
3.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1910 to 1936George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India from 1910 to 1936; gave up his German title in 1917 during World War I (1865-1936)
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha - the name of the royal family that ruled Great Britain from 1901-1917; the name was changed to Windsor in 1917 in response to anti-German feelings in World War I
House of Windsor, Windsor - the British royal family since 1917
4.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 1820 to 1830George - King of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 1820 to 1830; his attempt to divorce his estranged wife undermined the prestige of the Crown (1762-1830)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
5.George - King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820George - King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
6.George - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)George - King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover from 1727 to 1760 (1683-1760)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
7.George - Elector of Hanover and the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1727 (1660-1727)George - Elector of Hanover and the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 to 1727 (1660-1727)
Hanoverian line, House of Hanover, Hanover - the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Georg

George

[dʒɔːdʒ] NJorge
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

George

nGeorg m; by George! (dated Brit) → potz Blitz! (dated inf); (indicating determination) → bei Gott! (dated)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
George's mouth had all the exclusiveness of a fashionable club.
George's mind, as he paced the pier, was divided between the beauties of Nature and the forthcoming crisis in his affairs in the ratio of one-eighth to the former and seven-eighths to the latter.
We waited some time, but matters seemed to get only more and more involved, until, at last, George's head came wriggling out over the side of the boat, and spoke up.
And Harris, instead of merely observing, in his most unpleasant tones, that a fellow could hardly help treading on some bit of George's foot, if he had to move about at all within ten yards of where George was sitting, suggesting that George never ought to come into an ordinary sized boat with feet that length, and advising him to hang them over the side, as he would have done before supper, now said: "Oh, I'm so sorry, old chap; I hope I haven't hurt you."
George's face rather deepens as he replies, "Why no.
George's last remark by saying, "Afraid to order the pipe?
They will not be absent for more than two months; and the sea (as Sir James reminds me) did wonders for George's health when he returned from India.
Then he lapsed into silence, and swallowed sundry glasses of wine, looking more and more terrible, till a brisk knock at the door told of George's arrival when everybody began to rally.
He walked round briskly to George's side of the fire, and laid his hand kindly on his nephew's shoulder.
Perhaps he was shy, perhaps he was friendly, or perhaps he thought that George's face wanted washing.
A try!" yelled Freddy, snatching up George's bundle and placing it beside an imaginary goal-post.
This same gentleman, having heard of the fame of George's invention, took a ride over to the factory, to see what this intelligent chattel had been about.