Hepplewhite

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Related to George Hepplewhite: Hepplewhite Style, Thomas Chippendale

Hep·ple·white

 (hĕp′əl-wīt′, -hwīt′)
adj.
Of, relating to, being, or imitating an English style of furniture of the late 1700s, characterized by its light, graceful lines, the use of concave curves, and the shield or heart backs of its chairs.

[After George Hepplewhite.]

Hepplewhite

(ˈhɛpəlˌwaɪt)
adj
(Antiques) of, denoting, or made in a style of ornamental and carved 18th-century English furniture, of which oval or shield-shaped open chairbacks are characteristic
[C18: named after George Hepplewhite (1727–86), English cabinetmaker]

Hep•ple•white

(ˈhɛp əlˌʰwaɪt, -ˌwaɪt)

n.
1. George, died 1786, English furniture designer.
adj.
2. of or in the style of late 18th-century English furniture associated with George Hepplewhite, characterized by graceful curving lines and neoclassical motifs.
[1895–1900]
References in periodicals archive ?
The ultimate object for the rooms of a lady of status, the magnificent mahogany piece is inlaid with marquetry and complete with folding and sliding drawers, mirrors and many other extra features It is based on a design by George Hepplewhite and appears in "The Cabinetmaker and Upholsterers Guide" of 1786, assembled by Hepplewhite's widow, a book which gave the author's name to a whole period of designs from the last two decades of the 18th century.
Within five minutes Medhurst had been beaten again when Taylor was fouled and centre half George Hepplewhite scored from the resultant penalty.
At the end of the 18th century, Thomas Adamand George Hepplewhite did much to spread the fashion for the neo-classical style.
As furniture styles developed over the years, early English craftsmen such as George Hepplewhite, Thomas Sheraton, and the Adams brothers began to experiment with imported woods; it was they who set the standard for the use of mahogany in translating their designs.
Sheraton's delicate designs followed the tradition of George Hepplewhite.