geothermal power

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geothermal power

n
(Electrical Engineering) power generated using steam produced by heat emanating from the molten core of the earth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Geothermie
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Geothermal Alliance, launched UN climate talks aiming at a six fold increase in geothermal electricity production and tripling of geothermal derived heating by 2030.
USA is world's number one producer of geothermal electricity. It produces over 3,086 MW of installed capacity from 77 power plants.
The contribution from the AfDB and SEFA will be used to continue to raise more financing and will serve as a catalyst to rally independent geothermal electricity producers.
With its cool climate and abundance of water, Iceland is geographically rich in natural resources and can generate 100 percent renewable energy through geothermal electricity and hydroelectricity, making it an ideal location for energy intensive industries such as data centres.
The levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) is declining for wind, solar PV, CSP and some biomass technologies, while hydropower and geothermal electricity produced at good sites are still the cheapest way to generate electricity.
But it wasn't until 1960 that the first large-scale geothermal electricity generation plant began operating in California.
"What's really exciting about this is that you could build synthetic fuel production industries in places where they've got a lot of renewable energy that they currently can't use, for their own sufficiency in fuel or for another sector such as aviation." As a model, he suggested the way in which aluminium smelting developed in Iceland because of the abundance of cheap geothermal electricity there.
Engineers have begun pouring cold water on hot rocks thousands of feet below the surface of a dormant volcano in Central Oregon, where two companies hope to show they can generate enough geothermal electricity to power 50,000 homes.
On the occasion, President of Vita Pakistan, a food, beverages and dairy company, Mahboob Ali Manji pointed out that production of geothermal electricity is on the rise across the globe and with the help of this technology, Pakistan can generate cheapest power, costing only six cents per unit while thermal power cost 18 cents per unit.
Mike and his team also bring tremendous renewable energy knowledge including geothermal electricity generation.
Installed geothermal electricity capacity in the EU27 is approaching the threshold of one GWe (gigawatt-electric) or 10% of global geothermal installation.