Operation Barbarossa

(redirected from German invasion)
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Operation Barbarossa

n
(Military) the codename for Hitler's invasion (1941) of Russia
References in periodicals archive ?
An example of this was the welcome given by the town of Folkestone to 65,000 Belgian refugees in 1917 who had fled the German invasion.
THE inhabitants of an English seaside village make do and mend while they anxiously await the German invasion in the summer of 1940.
ARSENAL are braced for a German invasion for their Europa League showdown with Cologne.
WINSTON Churchill sought to block the release of secret Second World War documents revealing Nazi plans to install the Duke of Windsor as king in the event of a successful German invasion, according to newly-released government files.
The navy without air cover still might have been able to hold off a German invasion, but a navy with air cover was certainly more formidable.
Based at St George's Place in Llandudno, the role of the Home Guard was to protect North Wales in the event of a German invasion during the Second World War.
Last week I marked the anniversary of what is known as 'the Hardest Day' in that battle against German invasion - Tuesday August 18, 1940 - the day on which the Luftwaffe made an all-out assault on RAF Fighter Command, resulting in both sides losing more aircraft than on any other day during the campaign.
In Holocaust literature and film, little is mentioned of Breendonk, a fortress originally built to protect the Belgian city of Antwerp from German invasion in WWI and which later became an unofficial Nazi concentration camp where countless horrors took place.
Veterans were joined by HRH Prince Michael of Kent in Capelle-Ferne near Dover to remember those who stopped German invasion plans by defeating the Luftwaffe in 1940.
Mercifully the German invasion did not materialise and scenes depicted by the films Atonement and Saving Private Ryan, were avoided.
All internees were released in 1941 as the threat of German invasion subsided, and the site became a council estate in the mid-1940s.
Incidentally, in the forties, a number of underground "hides" were constructed in the UK to provide cover for volunteer guerilla fighters if the German invasion plans were successful.
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