German

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Ger·man

 (jûr′mən)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of Germany or its people.
2. Of or relating to the German language.
n.
1.
a. A native or inhabitant of Germany.
b. A person of German ancestry.
2. Any of the West Germanic languages and dialects spoken or originating in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland, especially standard High German.

[Middle English, from Latin Germānus.]

ger·man 1

 (jûr′mən)
n. Regional
1. An intricate dance for many couples.
2. A party for dancing at which this dance is featured.

[Short for German cotillion.]

ger·man 2

 (jûr′mən)
adj.
Having the same parents or the same grandparents on either the mother's or the father's side. Often used in combination: a cousin-german; a brother-german.

[Middle English germain, from Old French, from Latin germānus, from germen, offshoot; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

german

(ˈdʒɜːmən)
n
(Dancing) US a dance consisting of complicated figures and changes of partners
[C19: shortened from German cotillion]

german

(ˈdʒɜːmən)
adj
1. (Genetics) (used in combination)
a. having the same parents as oneself: a brother-german.
b. having a parent that is a brother or sister of either of one's own parents: cousin-german.
2. a less common word for germane
[C14: via Old French germain, from Latin germānus of the same race, from germen sprout, offshoot]

German

(ˈdʒɜːmən)
n
1. (Languages) the official language of Germany and Austria and one of the official languages of Switzerland; the native language of approximately 100 million people. It is an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch, closely related to English and Dutch. There is considerable diversity of dialects; modern standard German is a development of Old High German, influenced by Martin Luther's translation of the Bible. See also High German, Low German
2. (Peoples) a native, inhabitant, or citizen of Germany
3. (Peoples) a person whose native language is German: Swiss Germans; Volga Germans.
4. (Languages) a person whose native language is German: Swiss Germans; Volga Germans.
adj
5. (Languages) denoting, relating to, or using the German language
6. (Placename) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of any German state or its people
7. (Peoples) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of any German state or its people

ger•man

(ˈdʒɜr mən)

adj.
1. having the same father and mother, as a full brother or sister (usu. used in combination): a brother-german.
2. born of the brother or sister of one's father or mother, as a first cousin (usu. used in combination): a cousin-german.
[1250–1300; Middle English germain < Old French < Latin germānus, derivative of germen; see germ]

Ger•man

(ˈdʒɜr mən)
n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Germany.
2. the West Germanic language of Germany, Austria, and most of Switzerland, historically comprising a broad range of dialects. Abbr.: G Compare High German, Low German.
3. (usu. l.c.) an elaborate social dance resembling a cotillion.
4. (l.c.) New England and South Atlantic States. a dancing party featuring the german.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to Germany, its inhabitants, or their language.
[1520–30; < Latin Germānus German; c. Greek Germanoí (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.german - a person of German nationalityGerman - a person of German nationality  
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Teuton - someone (especially a German) who speaks a Germanic language
East German - a native or inhabitant of the former republic of East Germany
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
Berliner - an inhabitant of Berlin
Prussian - a German inhabitant of Prussia
Bavarian - a native or an inhabitant of Bavaria
2.german - the standard German languageGerman - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
Frau - a German courtesy title or form of address for an adult woman
Fraulein - a German courtesy title or form of address for an unmarried woman
Herr - a German courtesy title or form of address for a man
West Germanic, West Germanic language - a branch of the Germanic languages
Old High German - High German prior to 1200
Middle High German - High German from 1100 to 1500
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
Pennsylvania Dutch - a dialect of High German spoken in parts of Pennsylvania and Maryland
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
Adj.1.German - of or pertaining to or characteristic of Germany or its people or language; "German philosophers"; "German universities"; "German literature"

German

noun
Related words
prefixes Germano-, Teuto-
Translations
Duits
немски
alemany
němčinaNěmecněmeckýNěmkaGermán
tysktysker
GermanaGermano
saksa
آلمانی
saksasaksalainengermaani
גרמנית
जर्मन
Nijemacnjemačkinjemački jezikNjemicaGerman
német
germano
bahasa JermanJerman
Þjóðverjiþýskaþýskur
ドイツ語ドイツのドイツ人
독일어독일의독어독일 사람
GermanaGermanuslingua Germana
vokiečiųvokiečių kalba
tysktyskergermansk
germangermanănemţeşte
nemčina
NemecNemkanemščina
nemacnemačkinjemačkiНемацнемачки
tysktyska
kijerumani
ภาษาเยอรมันเกี่ยวกับเยอรมันชาวเยอรมัน
німецьканімецька мова
جرمن زبان
tiếng Đứcngười Đứcthuộc nước/người/tiếng Đức

German

[ˈdʒɜːmən]
A. ADJalemán
B. N
1. (= person) → alemán/ana m/f
2. (Ling) → alemán m
C. CPD German Democratic Republic N (Hist) → República f Democrática Alemana
German measles Nrubeola f, rubéola f
German shepherd (dog) Npastor m alemán, perro m lobo

German

[ˈdʒɜːrmən]
adjallemand(e)
n
(= person) → Allemand(e) m/f
(= language) → allemand m
Do you speak German? → Parlez-vous allemand?German Democratic Republic n
the German Democratic Republic → la République démocratique allemande

German

adjdeutsch; he is Germaner ist Deutscher; she is Germansie ist Deutsche
n
(= person)Deutsche(r) mf; the Germansdie Deutschen
(Ling) → Deutsch nt; German lessonsDeutschunterricht m; in Germanauf Deutsch; to speak GermanDeutsch sprechen

German

:
German measles
n singRöteln pl
German shepherd (dog), (US) German sheep dog
German-speaking
adjdeutschsprachig; German Switzerlanddie deutschsprachige Schweiz, die Deutschschweiz
German text, German type
n (Typ) → Fraktur f, → Frakturschrift f

German

[ˈdʒɜːmən]
1. adjtedesco/a
2. n
a. (person) → tedesco/a
b. (language) → tedesco

german

أَلْـمَانِيّ, اللغة الألمانية němčina, Němec, německý tysk, tysker Deutsch, Deutscher Γερμανικά, γερμανικός, Γερμανός alemán saksa, saksalainen allemand Nijemac, njemački tedesco ドイツの, ドイツ人, ドイツ語 독일 사람, 독일어, 독일의 Duits, Duitser tysk, tysker język niemiecki, Niemiec, niemiecki alemão немец, немецкий, немецкий язык tysk, tyska เกี่ยวกับเยอรมัน, ชาวเยอรมัน, ภาษาเยอรมัน Alman, Almanca người Đức, thuộc nước/người/tiếng Đức, tiếng Đức 德国人, 德国的, 德语
German   
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