gerrymandering

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ger·ry·man·der

 (jĕr′ē-măn′dər, gĕr′-)
tr.v. ger·ry·man·dered, ger·ry·man·der·ing, ger·ry·man·ders
To divide (a geographic area) into voting districts in a way that gives one party an unfair advantage in elections.
n.
1. The act, process, or an instance of gerrymandering.
2. A district or configuration of districts whose boundaries are very irregular due to gerrymandering.

[After Elbridge Gerry + (sala)mander (from the shape of an election district created while Gerry was governor of Massachusetts).]
Word History: In 1812, as governor of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry signed a bill authorizing the revision of voting districts in his state. Members of Gerry's party redrew them in order to secure their representation in the state senate, and out of Gerry's home county, Essex County, they carved an unlikely-looking district with the shape of a salamander. According to one version of the coining of gerrymander, the shape of the district attracted the eye of the painter Gilbert Stuart, who noticed it on a map in a newspaper editor's office. Stuart decorated the outline of the district with a head, wings, and claws and then said to the editor, "That will do for a salamander!" "Gerrymander!" came the reply. The image created by Stuart first appeared in the March 26, 1812, edition of the Boston Gazette, where it was accompanied by the following title: The Gerrymander. A New Species of Monster, which appeared in the Essex South District in Jan. 1812. The new word gerrymander caught on instantly—within the same year gerrymander is also recorded as a verb. (Gerry's name, incidentally, was pronounced with a hard (g) sound, although the word which has immortalized him is now commonly pronounced with a soft (j) sound.) Gerry ran for reelection in 1812, and popular outrage directed at the flagrant use of the technique we now call gerrymandering doubtless played a role in his defeat.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gerrymandering

1. Redrawing election district boundaries for political purposes (possibly because of Massachusetts governor Elbridge Gerry, 1812). A blackface song and dance act based on a deformed livery stable slave (c. 1833) which came to symbolize racial prejudice.
2. The practice of fixing the boundaries of electoral districts in a way that gives unfair advantage to a particular party.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

gerrymandering

[ˈdʒerɪmændərɪŋ] Nmanipulaciones fpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gerrymandering

[ˌdʒɛriˈmændərɪŋ] nredécoupage m des circonscriptions électorales
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gerrymandering

n (Pol) → Wahlkreisschiebungen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Current Gerry-mandering of district is completely unacceptable as it allows politicians and the party select their voters rather than the voters selecting their elected officials, which is why we need to take the drawing out of the hands of the politicians and put it in the hands of an independent commission.
Surely it would be better that the ballot proceeded without the slightest hint of 'gerry-mandering'.
The practice of gerry-mandering, unforeseen by the framers of the Constitution and now honed to a science by the use of modern statistical software, has made races in the House uncompetitive, assured a Republican majority for the foreseeable future, and pushed the parties to their extremes.