Gestalt psychology


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Related to Gestalt psychology: Humanistic psychology, gestalt therapy

Gestalt psychology

n.
The school or theory in psychology holding that psychological, physiological, and behavioral phenomena are irreducible experiential configurations not derivable from a simple summation of perceptual elements such as sensation and response.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gestalt psychology

n
(Psychology) a system of thought, derived from experiments carried out by German psychologists, that regards all mental phenomena as being arranged in Gestalts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Gestalt′ psychol′ogy


n.
the school or doctrine holding that behavioral and psychological phenomena cannot be fully explained by analysis of their component parts, as reflexes or sensations, but must be studied as wholes.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gestalt psychology - (psychology) a theory of psychology that emphasizes the importance of configurational properties
Gestalt law of organization, Gestalt principle of organization - a principle of Gestalt psychology that identifies factors leading to particular forms of perceptual organization
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
holism, holistic theory - the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in their relation to the whole; "holism holds that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts"; "holistic theory has been applied to ecology and language and mental states"
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Gestalt psychology

nGestaltpsychologie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gestalt psychology

ngestaltismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolfgang Kohler, one of the founders of Gestalt psychology, described the phenomenon of the self-organizing brain in his Dynamics of Psychology (1940).
Gestalt psychology tries to understand the laws of our ability to acquire and maintain meaningful perceptions in an apparently chaotic world [31].
A century ago, gestalt psychology established the so-called gestalt laws--referring primarily to visual gestalts (Ash 133).
Ignorance is of little/no assistance in developing the whole person in gestalt psychology. The following current events items in terms of understanding and meaning need emphasizing:
As has often been pointed out, in Meta + Hodos Tenney was richly influenced by Gestalt psychologist Kurt Koffka, but we need more detailed studies of the relations between Gestalt psychology and phenomenology in the 1950s, and therefore exactly how Tenney could have understood the two in relation to his project.
It has also been helpful to speak of [behavorism.sub.Gestalt] (behavorism as the Gestalt psychologists describe it), and Gestalt [psychology.sub.Behaviorist] (Gestalt psychology as the behaviorist writers describe it).
Koffka, Principles of Gestalt Psychology, Harcourt, New York, NY, USA, 1935.
However, most studies on perceptual organization factors were developed within the theoretical framework of Gestalt psychology, mainly by Max Wertheimer (1923, see Vezzani, Marino, & Giore, 2012, for an extensive review of this issue).
The following six chapters look at the Behaviorist tradition, psychoanalysis, Gestalt psychology, theoretical and applied psychology after WWI, behaviorism and psychoanalysis in the mid-twentieth century, and Humanistic and Cognitive psychology.