hypertension

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Related to Gestational hypertension: Gestational diabetes

hy·per·ten·sion

 (hī′pər-tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. Abnormally elevated arterial blood pressure.
b. Arterial disease marked by chronic high blood pressure.
2. Elevated pressure or tension of a body fluid, as of the intraocular or cerebrospinal fluids.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hypertension

(ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃən)
n
(Pathology) pathol abnormally high blood pressure
hypertensive adj, n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•per•ten•sion

(ˌhaɪ pərˈtɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. elevation of the blood pressure, esp. the diastolic pressure.
b. an arterial disease characterized by this condition.
2. excessive nervous tension.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·per·ten·sion

(hī′pər-tĕn′shən)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hypertension

High blood pressure, often caused by stress, arteriosclerosis, or heart disease.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)
cardiovascular disease - a disease of the heart or blood vessels
essential hypertension, hyperpiesia, hyperpiesis - persistent and pathological high blood pressure for which no specific cause can be found
malignant hypertension - severe hypertension that runs a rapid course and damages the inner linings of the blood vessels and the heart and spleen and kidneys and brain; "malignant hypertension is the most lethal form of hypertension"
secondary hypertension - hypertension that is secondary to another disease
white-coat hypertension - temporary rise in blood pressure in the doctor's office
hypotension - abnormally low blood pressure
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
hypertenze

hypertension

[ˈhaɪpəˈtenʃən] N (Med) → hipertensión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpərˈtɛnʃən] nhypertension f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃn] n (Med) → ipertensione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hy·per·ten·sion

n. hipertensión, presión arterial alta;
benign ______ benigna;
essential ______ esencial;
malignant ______ maligna;
portal ______ portal;
primary ______ primaria;
renal ______ renal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypertension

n hipertensión f, presión alta (de la sangre) (fam); benign intracranial — hipertensión intracraneal benigna; essential — hipertensión esencial; malignant — hipertensión maligna; portal — hipertensión portal; pulmonary — hipertensión pulmonar; renovascular — hipertensión renovascular; white-coat — hipertensión de bata blanca
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The classification, diagnosis, prediction, prevention, and management of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and chronic hypertension are addressed in the report.
The level of cardiovascular risk that was conferred by a placental syndrome--preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, or placental abruption or infarction--was found to be comparable to that of conventional risk factors such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia.
Patients were assigned to the following experimental groups without knowledge of results for sICAM-1 or sVCAM-1: preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome, gestational hypertension (without proteinuria), fetal retardation, preterm labor, gestational diabetes, gestational proteinuria (without hypertension), infections during pregnancy, and miscellaneous pregnancy-related disorders.
While gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction have previously all been shown to be associated with increased risk of incident cardiovascular disease, this huge California study provides the first strong epidemiologic evidence that placental abruption is as well.
The overall incidence of PIH at the centre being 10% with contribution of gestational hypertension 26 (26%), mild preeclampsia 11 (11%), severe preeclampsia 34 (34%) eclampsia 19 (19%) and HELLP syndrome 10 (10%).
WHEN A 30-YEAR-OLD WOMAN went to a hospital in labor, she had gestational hypertension. The next morning, she suffered cardiopulmonary arrest.
The researchers, led by Denice Feig from the University of Toronto, Canada, found that pre-eclampsia (a condition in which affected pregnant women have high blood pressure, fluid retention, and protein in their urine), and gestational hypertension (high blood pressure associated with pregnancy) could double the chance of being diagnosed with diabetes many years after pregnancy.
Other significant correlates of systolic blood pressure were gender, height, BMI, birth weight, gestational hypertension, and parental hypertension.
And gestational hypertension, research has shown, is a clear risk factor for later hypertension.
Patients were further classified according to the National High Blood Pressure Education Working Group (NHBPEP) (2000) as having Gestational hypertension (83 cases), mild preeclampsia (38 cases), severe preeclampsia (13 cases) and eclampsia (6 cases).
The FP admitted the mother to a hospital for induction of labor at 38 weeks' gestation with concerns of increased uric acid, possible gestational hypertension, and leaking amniotic fluid.
However, there is no clear consensus regarding the benefit of treatment for mild to moderate gestational hypertension.

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