ghost dance

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ghost dance

n.
Any of several group dances associated with two messianic religious movements among Native American peoples of the Southwest and Great Plains in the late 1800s. Ghost dance prophets foretold the imminent disappearance of whites, the restoration of traditional lands and ways of life, and the resurrection of dead ancestors.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ghost dance

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a religious dance of certain North American Indians, connected with a political movement (from about 1888) that looked to reunion with the dead and a return to an idealized state of affairs before Europeans came
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ghost′ dance`


n.
(often caps.) a ritual dance to call forth a vision of the afterlife: a central feature of a religious movement among American Indians in the late 19th century.
[1885–90, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ghost dance

A Native American ceremonial group dance carried out as part of the observation of a religion that foretold the resurrection of ancestors and the disappearance of the white people.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ghost dance - a religious dance of Native Americans looking for communication with the deadghost dance - a religious dance of Native Americans looking for communication with the dead
ceremonial dance, ritual dance, ritual dancing - a dance that is part of a religious ritual
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890.
Meshing the past with the present and traditional mythologies with the day-to-day, the characters attempted to live up to and honor the memory of their ancestors who fought at the Battle of Little Big Horn, participated in the Ghost Dance religion, and later joined the Wild West Shows as a viable economic alternative to reservation life.
In 1890, Wovoka, a Paiute influenced by Shakers, started the Ghost Dance Religion in the Northwest, and it spread quickly to the Plains.
Accounts include a Hopi story of A Journey to the Skeleton House, Ohiyesa's (Charles Eastman's) story, the Ghost Dance Religion of the Lakota, the Gitxan Reincarnation Case of Rhonda Mead, and many more.
By utilizing, for instance, a close reading of James Mooney's The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890 (University of Nebraska Press, 1991), Glancy explains how fragmentary or deliberately obtuse texts can be employed in what the author refers to as "ghosting" in a narrative form ("Preface," x), a method of filling in where history has a left a hole in our understanding.
She offers new insights into the Ghost Dance religion in South Dakota and reveals some of the tactics utilized by the Lakota to deal with the demands of the dominant society of late-19th-century America.
Jesus's apostles resembled the more militant members of the Ghost Dance religion of the late nineteenth-century plains tribes, who likewise blended indigenous shamanism and Judeo-Christian end-times prophecy.
His interviews and observations concerning the Ghost Dance religion that was embraced by the Plains tribes in the early 1890s are recorded in this volume.