ghost prisoner

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ghost prisoner

n
(Law) informal a prisoner, esp one held in US military captivity, whose detention is not publicly acknowledged
References in periodicals archive ?
He was a so-called "ghost detainee" who was intentionally hidden from the Red Cross on subsequent inspections and held without appearing on the prisoner lists.
"Flying prisons." "Ghost detainees." The most awful types of torture and other violations have been carried out.
Protesters demanded that the Parliament intervene to put an end to these acts and release the "ghost detainees," as they are often called because of their secret status.
"Third, we need to put our own house in order and stop pursuing human rights disasters of our own: whether Abu Ghraib, Guantanamo, or other black sites where ghost detainees are being held.
Consider the intentional injection of euphemism into the argot of interrogation--"enhanced interrogation techniques" "custodial interviews," "stress positions"--and the legal circumvention embodied in such questionable practices as extraordinary rendition, black sites, and ghost detainees.
The list of the "ghost detainees" also named relatives of suspects who said they were detained in secret prisons, including children as young as seven.
US military investigations have also criticised the CIA for hiding so-called 'ghost detainees' from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Afghanistan.
ABU GHRAIB, BAGRAM AIR BASE, AND AN UNSPEAKABLE-hellhole-to-be-named-later in an FBI, Amnesty International, or Red Cross report; ghost detainees, child detainees; torture in Iraq, torture in Afghanistan, torture in Cuba; criminal probes into more than 30 deaths of detainees while in U.S.
Not only do these recent charges need airing, but also the philosophy behind and practice of holding suspects incommunicado, ghost detainees, extraordinary rendition and the "softening up" of prisoners for interrogation on a regular basis.
government for its measures to restrict the application of the Geneva Conventions, and for attempting to justify the use of coercive interrogation techniques, the practice of holding ''ghost detainees'' and the ''rendering'' of prisoners to third countries known to practice torture.
These people were referred to as "ghost detainees" ...